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PRESS RELEASE


DOLE identifies key employment generators,



skills requirements for 2011-2020
Department of Labor and Employment Undersecretary Romeo C. Lagman yesterday bared the results of Projects JobsFit: The DOLE 2020 Vision, saying that that agribusiness; cyber services; health and wellness; hotel, restaurant and medical tourism; mining; construction; banking and finance; manufacturing; ownership dwelling and real estate; transport and logistics; wholesale and retail trade; and overseas employment would be the key employment generators (KEGs) in the next ten years.
“We are happy to report the results of our study which identifies these key employment generators and their skills requirements for 2011 to 2020. These KEGs have the potential of absorbing the most number of workers with skills on these fields or industries,” Lagman said during a press conference held to announce the study’s results.
Lagman said the Project JobsFit study also identifies four emerging industries that will likely provide greater employment opportunities in the next five to ten years.
These emerging industries are creative industries; diversified/strategic farming and fishing; power and utilities; and renewable energy.
Project JobsFit is one of the DOLE’s six priority deliverable projects for 2009. A ten-month nationwide research project, it involved environmental scanning, information gathering, networking, consultation, and ‘signaling’ activities aimed at identifying local and global industries that would drive employment growth, including the corresponding skills requirements for the next ten years.
“With the results of Project JobsFit now available, students, new entrants to the labor market, and the out-of-school youth, will have a primary guide on what college or technical/vocational courses they should pursue or take,” Lagman said, adding:
“The results will also serve as basis for policy makers to formulate appropriate policies; for education officials to re-design curricula and tailor-fit scholarships; and for private sector stakeholders to fashion out training and career development programs that are responsive to the needs and demands of the labor market.”
The labor undersecretary said that the DOLE’s Project JobsFit also seeks to address the major problem of skills and jobs mismatch.
In announcing the results of the study, Lagman said the next labor and employment secretary could follow through the recommendations of Project JobsFit, noting that the study was a product of extensive and comprehensive consultations with businessmen, bankers, captains of industries, education and tech-voc officials, PESO managers, labor officials, finance experts and specialists, members of the academe, licensed employment service providers, chambers of commerce and industry, trade associations, and individual entrepreneurs, among other public and private sector stakeholders.
“The DOLE also perused and analyzed voluminous studies and labor market information and conducted interviews, briefings, and round-table discussions during the conduct of the study,” he said.
END

PRESS RELEASE


DOLE urges DepEd, CHED to consider JobsFit recommendations to address skills-jobs mismatch


Department of Labor and Employment Undersecretary Romeo C. Lagman yesterday urged the Department of Education and the Commission on Higher Education to use the results of the Project JobsFit: The DOLE 2020 Vision as basis for reviewing the school curriculum and for re-designing career guidance programs to address the chronic problem of skills-jobs mismatch.
This, as the DOLE bared the results of a ten-month nationwide study project aimed at identifying local and global industries that would drive employment growth, including the corresponding skills requirements, for the next ten years.
In a press conference, the Labor official said that one of the results of Project JobsFit shows that the country’s education curriculum is no longer responsive to the needs of industries and businesses operating in the current global environment, resulting to Filipino graduates not being able to land jobs and occupations in line with their courses.
“The problem of skills-jobs mismatch is caused by our education curriculum not being responsive to industry needs,” Lagman said, quoting from the Project JobsFit study.
The review of the education curriculum and the intensification of career guidance are two of the main key policy actions being recommended by Project JobsFit, which involved environmental scanning, information gathering, networking, consultation, and ‘signaling’ activities.
“We have to start an intensified career guidance program starting in third year high school and this should include gender awareness, current work practices, and potential opportunities for both technical-vocational and college courses to ensure that students make effective career choices,” Lagman said, noting that the DOLE, the DepEd and the Professional Regulation Commission are already conducting discussions on the matter.

The DOLE study has identified the following as key employment generators (KEGs) in the next five to ten years: agribusiness; cyber services; health and wellness; hotel, restaurant and medical tourism; mining; construction; banking and finance; manufacturing; ownership dwelling and real estate; transport and logistics; wholesale and retail trade; and overseas employment.


It has also identified four emerging industries that will likely provide greater employment opportunities from 2011 to 2020. These emerging industries are creative industries; diversified/strategic farming and fishing; power and utilities; and renewable energy.
One of the DOLE’s six priority deliverable projects for 2009, Project JobsFit also recommends a refocus of agriculture courses and a review of their standards to enable agriculture graduates to cope with changes and trends in the industry.
It also recommends to make on-the-job-training relevant to students’ field of work and to review the existing Apprenticeship and Learnership Law for the purpose of strengthening industry-academe linkages.
“The strict implementation and monitoring of this policy would improve the skills qualifications of students, increase their employability, and resolve the problem of “lack of experience” of fresh graduates,” Lagman said.
END

PRESS RELEASE


JobsFit study says jobs are in agriculture/agribusiness, cyber-services,


The Department of Labor and Employment yesterday said that Filipinos looking for employment would be better off if they focus on agriculture and cyber-services, two of the sectors that would drive employment growth in the next five to ten years.
“Agriculture/agribusiness and cyber-services are two of the 12 key employment generators (KEGs) that have the potential for absorbing the most number of Filipino workers from 2011 to 2020,” said DOLE Undersecretary Romeo C. Lagman during a press conference held to announce the results of Project JobsFit: The DOLE 2020 Vision.
Project JobsFit is a ten-month, nationwide study project aimed at identifying local and global industries that would drive employment growth, including the corresponding skills requirements, for the next ten years.
The study, which involved environmental scanning, information gathering, networking, consultation, and ‘signaling’ activities, also aimed to identify employment gaps and issues, such as the jobs-skills mismatch, and recommend strategies to address these.
Lagman said some of the positions in the agriculture sector that would most likely be in-demand during the next five to ten years are aqua-culturists, fish nursery workers, shrimp and fish grow-out workers, prawn farm cultivators, aquaculture farm caretakers and aides, and aquaculture facilities, repair and maintenance workers.
On the other hand, the cyber-services industry would likely be demanding thousands of animators, clean-up artists, in-between artists, art checkers, animation checkers, web designers, multi-media artists, library builders, layout artists, and 2D digital animators.
“These positions, many of them now needed by companies, would be hard-to-fill and, therefore, be in-demand,” Lagman said.
Project JobsFit has identified the following as the other KEGs in the next ten years: health and wellness; hotel, restaurant and medical tourism; mining; construction; banking and finance; manufacturing; ownership dwelling and real estate; transport and logistics; wholesale and retail trade; and overseas employment.
Aside from the KEGs, Project JobsFit has also identified four emerging industries that will likely provide greater employment opportunities in the next 10 years. These are creative industries; diversified/strategic farming and fishing; power and utilities; and renewable energy.
The full list of specific skills or occupations for the KEGs and for the emerging industries are contained in the results of the DOLE study and can be obtained from the Bureau of Local Employment.
END

PRESS RELEASE


Provision of career guidance to HS studes among key JobsFit recommendations


Department of Labor and Employment Undersecretary Romeo C. Lagman yesterday said providing early career guidance, to start with third year high school students, is one of the key policy recommendations of Projects JobsFit: The DOLE 2020 Vision, a ten-month nationwide research project aimed at identifying local and global industries that would drive employment growth, including the corresponding skills requirements for the next ten years.
In a press conference held to announce the results of the study, Lagman said one of the causes of the jobs-skills mismatch problem is the lack of labor market information that could help students make effective career choices.
Hence, we are recommending to our education authorities that policy measures be implemented to intensify career guidance starting from third year high school to empower high school students to make effective career choices when they enter the university,” he said.
“The career guidance program should include gender awareness, current work practices, and potential opportunities for tech-voc and college courses,” he added.
Lagman explained that on the part of the DOLE, efforts are already being made to intensify labor market information dissemination, particularly on hard-to-fill and in-demand occupations, including college degree courses with oversupply of enrollees. This, he said, is also one of the key Project JobsFit recommendations.
The key policy actions and recommendations of Project JobsFit are as follows:


  1. Make OJT work experience relevant to students’ field of work to improve students’ skills qualification and resolve the problem of ‘lack of experience’ of fresh graduates.

  2. Review the existing Apprenticeship and Learnership Law to strengthen industry-academe linkages

  3. Promote the establishment of a government agency to handle HRD concerns.

  4. Refocus agricultural courses and review standards to cope with changes and trends in the industry/sector.

  5. Intensify career guidance starting from third year high school and include gender awareness, current work practices, and potential opportunities for tech-voc and college courses to ensure effective career choices.

  6. Intensify labor market information dissemination, particularly on hard-to-fill and in-demand occupations, including college degree courses with oversupply of enrollees, to enable students to make informed career decisions and course choices.

  7. Make the best talents stay in the country.

  8. Create employment opportunities for nurses to address oversupply.

  9. Develop and strengthen emerging industries and harness OFW remittances for investments that create employment.

  10. Re-assess and review the Labor Code, as well as existing work-related laws and policies, to adapt to the changing times.

“With the results of Project JobsFit now available, students, new entrants to the labor market, and out-of-school youth, will have a primary guide on what college or technical/vocational courses they should pursue or take,” Lagman said, adding:


“The results will also serve as basis for policy makers to formulate appropriate policies; for education officials to re-design curricula and tailor-fit scholarships; and for private sector stakeholders to fashion out training and career development programs that are responsive to the needs and demands of the labor market.”
END




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