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Homicides of Adults in Franklin County, Georgia, to 1900


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Homicides of Adults in Franklin County, Georgia, to 1900

NOTE: Ken Wheeler, 8/2001, worked through the Toccoa newspapers, 1880-1900, but he had yet to look at the few earlier Toccoa newspapers, or systematically at the Franklin Co. newspapers, which he's gleaned only for murders.


FRA


Class of death:

Class of crime:

Relationship:

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Intoxication?:

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Holiday?:

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Days until death:

S
Suspect(s


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VICTIM(s):

Cause of death:
Circumstances:
Inquest:
Indictment:
Term of court:
Court proceedings:


Legal records:


Newspapers:


Other sources:


Census:


Genealogy:

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Phys char:

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Personal history:

1788, Oct. 18 FRA

P
Class: probable

Crime: HOM or WAR

Rela: NONDOM INDIAN by SETTLER

Motive: POLITICAL

Intox?:


Day of week: Sat

Holiday?:

Time of day: evening

Days to death: 0

S
Suspect(s
USPECT(s): white settlers [6 or 7 men involved]
VICTIM(s): a Creek Indian

Weapon: musket
Circumstances:
Inquest:
Indictment: no
Term:
Court proceedings:

Legal records:

Newspaper:
GSG 10/25/1788 (Sat): HOM of IND by SETTLER in GA: Franklin Co.: letter from T. P. Carnes and G. Walker, Esqs., who arrived in Augusta last Th night from Franklin Co. On Indian raids in nearby SC & on "the Georgia side" of the river. On F the Indians passed over to the Ga. side, "killed a beef & a hog, stole about forty pounds of lead . . . and burnt several houses, the property of a Mr. Briant Ward." On Sat evening, the Indians fired on 2 men who were hobbling horses in the woods near Ward's station. "The men who were in the block house, to the number of four or five only, ran out to the assistance of those who were shot at, and a small skirmish ensued, in which one man was dangerously wounded; they killed on Indian and wounded another, but finding the Indians were too numerous, they were obliged to repair to the blackhouse. The Indians then retired with several valuable horses." About 30 Indians: 12 or 15 Creeks, the rest Cherokees.

Census:

Genealogy:
Accused: ___
Ethnicity:

Race: w


Gender: m

Age: adult

Literate:

Marital Status:

Children:

Occupation: [farmer]

Town:

Birthplace:



Religion:

Organizations:

Victim: ___
Ethnicity: Creek

Race: Ind

Gender: m

Age: adult

Literate:

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Birthplace:



Religion:

Organizations:


1788, Oct. 31 FRA

P
Class: probable

Crime: HOM or WAR

Rela: NONDOM INDIAN by SETTLER

Motive: POLITICAL

Intox?:


Day of week: F

Holiday?:

Time of day:

Days to death: 0

S
Suspect(s
USPECT(s): party of hunters [assume 5 men]
VICTIM(s): an Indian

Weapon: [shot with musket]
Circumstances:
Inquest:
Indictment: no
Term:
Court proceedings:


Legal records:

Newspaper:
Georgia State Gazette 11/15/1788 (Sat): "We hear from Franklin county, that, on Friday the 31st ult. as some men were hunting, they were fired at by a small party of Indians, who immediately ran off; the white people pursued the Savages and killed one of them."

Census:

Genealogy:
Accused: ___
Ethnicity:

Race: w


Gender: m

Age: adult

Literate:

Marital Status:

Children:

Occupation: [hunter]

Town: FRA

Birthplace:

Religion:

Organizations:

Victim: ___
Ethnicity:

Race: Ind

Gender: m

Age: adult

Literate:

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Occupation:

Town:

Birthplace:



Religion:

Organizations:


1790, [Nov.] FRA

P
Class: certain

Crime: HOM

Rela: NONDOM SETTLERS by INDIANS

Motive: POLITICAL

Intox?:


Day of week:

Holiday?:

Time of day:

Days to death: [0]

S
Suspect(s
USPECT(s): Creek Indians
VICTIM(s): Mr. John Cleveland and Mr. McDowall

Weapon:
Circumstances: JC & M of Franklin Co. "went into the nation in pursuit of horses that were stolen from them. A boy, who narrowly escaped the face of his companions, brought the information."
Inquest:
Indictment: no
Term:
Court proceedings:


Legal records:

Newspaper:
Augusta Chronicle 11/20/1790

Census:

Genealogy:
Accused: ___
Ethnicity: Creek

Race: Ind

Gender: m

Age: adult

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Birthplace:



Religion:

Organizations:

Victim 1: John Cleveland
Ethnicity:

Race: w


Gender: m

Age: adult

Literate:

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Children:

Occupation: [farmer]

Town: FRA

Birthplace:

Religion:

Organizations:


Victim 2: ___ McDowall
Ethnicity:

Race: w


Gender: m

Age: adult

Literate:

Marital Status:

Children:

Occupation: [farmer]

Town: FRA

Birthplace:

Religion:

Organizations:


1792, Nov. Ward's Mill, FRA

FILE


P
Class: certain

Crime: HOM: several adult Indians

Rela: NONDOM

Motive: POLITICAL / GENOCIDE

Intox?:

Day of week:

Holiday?:

Time of day:

Days to death:

S
Suspect(s


USPECT(s): Capt. David McCluskey of Elbert Co.
VICTIM(s): two Cherokee men (and aik. on a Cherokee woman)

Weapon: shot with guns
Circumstances: Aug. Chr.: "two of seven Indians of the aforesaid nation, who had been invited into the settlements to hold a friendly talk concerning the late murders by Indians, were killed at Ward's mill, in Franklin county, and a squaw at the same time wounded.
Inquest:
Indictment: unknown
Term:
Court proceedings: arrested and jailed for trial at the next Sup. Ct. in Franklin Co.


Legal records:
HOM: MURDER (1792): Capt. David McCluskey of Elbert Co. m. some Indians.
Deposition of John Thurmond that Capt. David McCluskey of Elbert Co. murdered some Indians in Franklin Co. in Nov., 1792. d.d. 4/13/1793. Warrant for DMcC's arrested & a note that he had been arrested & jailed.

Davis, Robert Scott, Jr. Wilkes County Papers, 1773-1833 (Easley, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1979), 201. From the Wilkes County Collection, William R. Perkins Library, Duke University. (201-215)

File [Box 5 159-1-59]
FSC 58: MURDER: Wilkes Co., GA: affadavit of John Thurman [s] stating that be believes that David McCluskey (aka Capt. David McCluskey) of Elbert Co. on 11/__/1792 in Franklin Co. murdered certain Indians of the Creek or Cherokee nation. d.d. 4/13/1793.

File [Box 5 159-1-59]


FSC 59: MURDER: Wilkes Co., GA: warrant for arrested of David McLeskey, 4/13/1793. To be tried at next Superior Court in Franklin Co.


Newspaper:
Augusta Chronicle 11/17/1792: "We are informed that a party of white men from the frontiers of this state, has of late made an incursion to the Cherokee nation, burnt one of their towns, and killed three of their people: -- That two of seven Indians of the aforesaid nation, who had been invited into the settlements to hold a friendly talk concerning the late murders by Indians, were killed at Ward's mill, in Franklin county, and a squaw at the same time wounded. These transactions are, no doubt, considered by the doers of them as striking the balance on savage account, it is however assuming a great deal, (to leave humanity and policy out of the question) for individuals to take upon themselves to judge (and carry into edecution that judgment) on matters which involve the general tranquility."
Augusta Chronicle 12/1/1792: proclamation by Governor Edward Telfair, 11/14/1792, on notice "that certain armed men on the Western frontier of this state, did, of late, fire upon and kill several amiable Indians of the Cherokee nation." Cites the Georgia Act of 6/10/1774 "that to murder any free Indian in amity, is by the law of the land as penal to all intents and purposes whatsoever, as to murer any white." And persons rescuing anyone suspected of such murders are themselves guilty of felony. To prevent Indian war, orders all authorities, civil & military, to "use their best endeavours to apprehend, and bring to justice such offenders."
Augusta Chronicle 5/11/1793: letter from Major Forsyth to his friend in Alexandria, dated Lamberts, on the road to Savannah, 36 mi. below Augusta, 2/6/1793. "I have been gone several days endeavouring to lay hold of some of the persons, the object of the President's Proclamation. I succeeded in arresting the Captain of the band, David McClusky, whom I apprehended in the court-yard of Elbert county, surrounded by his fellows. I chose this place the rather, because it had been said, that five hundred men could not take him out of the county. He was provided for an armed party; but not suspecting me, I laid hold of him before he could use his rifle; and by threatning him and his coadjutors with the strong arm of the union, I was able to bring him off, he is now with me on his way to the Federal Judge, I stopped here to drop you a line which I was not able to do in Augusta, being under apprehensions of my prisoner's escape, as many people take pains to increase his fears."
Augusta Chronicle 5/11/1793: also, letter from David McCluskey from Washington, Wilkes Co., 4/23/1793, to the Baltimore Daily Repository: his response to Forsyth's above letter, which the paper published 3/1/1793 in the BDR. "My local situation (being in an obscure corner of the unfortunate, and oppssed state of Georgia)" prevented him from responding sooner. Calls Forsyth a liar & questions whether he is a "gentleman"--says F's letter written [& published by F's "friend"] "for the purpose of continuing the deception, that the people of Georgia are a lawless banditti. I wish that pretended friend's residence could be fixed a while on the frontiers of this devoted state, he would probably meet his deserts--a tomahawk and scalping knife: I mean the first part of his deserts; the completion of them can be nothing less than a permanent establishment amid hell-flames.

NOW FOR THE FACTS.

Some Indians (whether Cherokees or Creeks is not yet reduced to a certainty) killed Mr. Yarborough and his son, on the Oconee river [Mr. Seagrove has intimated they were killed by lightning, but he lies wilfully; there were bullet holes through them both]; a while after, a Mr. Bobo was killed on Broad river, not very far from my residence, and soon after that, a Mr. Thompson in the same neighbourhood. Mr. Doolin was then sent to the Cherokee nation, under the sanction of a flag to try and recover prisoners and property; in violation of which, when he attempted to return home, they murdered him about a mile from the town where he delivered the message. Their next stroke was on Mrs. Crocket and family, a respectable widow lady, and an equally respectable family; where their conduct was such that modesty, humanity and philanthropy shrink from the idea, like a snail when his borns experience a rough touch. They killed and scalped the whole family (consisting of eight) amongst whom were the old lady and two amiable daughters, whom they not only scalped, but skinned the lower part of their bellies and pudendums, and carried them off as Knoxonian thropies of refinement in ferocity.

Blush K___, for forming such a base alliance (if it is possible for thee to blush) and blush Forsyth for supporting it; and blush ____ ____ ____, and all the long &c's--if thou hadst any hand in one or t'other.

Those respectable aborigines carried off property, from the neighbourhood and habitatino of Mrs. Crocket, to the amount of several hundred pounds, and I forsooth, because I followed and tried to recover some of the plundered property, and in so doing necessarily made some trifling reprisals--am persecuted by the Federal and State Governments, and made a foot ball, to be bandied backwards and forewards, as whim, or rthe spirit of vindictiveness may alternately prevail.* I collected a few men and pursued, I did not mean plundernor indiscrimnate retaliation. I followed their trail and passed several of their towns, molesting none but that in which they had taken refuge. I returned in the same peacable manner, after having taken a partial vengeance only, on the town which afforded an asylum to the hostile savages.--The towns I passed were all in my power: They were three in number. I passed and repassed them in the night, undiscovered, and so near to some of them, that we could see their fires very distinctly.

Soon after our return from the excursion, the Governor of Georgia issued a proclamation, wherein, amongst other wise injuctions, he strictly charges and enjoins all persons whomsoever, not to suffer their stock (should they straggle across the line) to bite off any blades of Indian grass.--His next will probably prohibit our pigeons to cross the Appalachee river, lest they, perchance, pick up a few acorns, and thereby prevent the Indian Bears and Deer from getting quite so fat as they night otherwise do.

At Elbert court Major Forsyth arrested me, (none about me); but so far was he from bringing me off, by threatning me and my coadjurors (as he pompously says) with the strong arm of the Union, that he condescended to sooth and persuade me, till I agreed to go voluntarily, having first received his promise, that if I was not admitted to bail, his house should be my only gaol, and such I found it, where I experienced every species of polieness and genteel treatment I could wish for or expect, from the Major, his lady and family.

Conscious innocence fears nothing.

At Elbert court-house, a number of friends assembled and proffered to release me, but I chose to stand trial.--Fifteen miles from thence we crossed Broad river, then very high. I carried the Major over, and then carried back the boat, to fetch his and my horses.--If I wished to escape, what then hindered me? There was a rapid river between us, he on foot and I on horseback. I could have pushed the boat out into the strem, and there was not another within ten miles. Eighteen miles from Broad river we came hither, where some of the most respectable gentlemen (till then strangers to me) proffered to release me, which I again refused.--From Washington, major Forsyth rode off, leaving me with the gentlemen who had proffered to release me, and desired me to follow him on.--I rode more than a mile before I overtook him.

When arrived in Augusta, I lived in Major Forsyth's house, where I was treated (as before observed) with every degree of politeness and hospitality; and except the mere nominality of being a prisoner, was as much at liberty, during my stay there as any man in the town. Did these things shew him apprehensive of my attempting an escape?

Americans (Georgians in particular) have fought to a fine purpose under the banners of the immortal Washington, if [sic: yet] Indians are to be suffered (nay courted) to murder and plunder our citizens with impunity, and citizens dare not retaliate, lest they draw on themselves the wrath of minions, and 'the strong arm of the Union.' A blssed arm indeed, as hitherto exercised.--It is like a termagant step-mother, always ready to scourge, but never to protect.

The oppressors of Georgia roll in their coaches, and loll on the couches, gorging on the fruits of their various peculations, extorted from the labors of the honest industrious planter and farmer, and whilst rioting in all the luxury of Eastern Nabobs, are trying to follow the example of king David, when he took the poor man's only lamb--[I do not mean that passion called the lust of women, but of riches and power]--; and in the interim they have their toad eaters strewed throughout the Union--but more plentiful in Georgia than elsewhere--buzzing in the people's ears, 'The President is infallible, Hamilton almost ditto, Jefferson a mere Muser, whilst his brothers Arron, and K__x, a mngrel, begotten by the d___l on an angel of light, and therefore a very proper object to execute diabolical sc[h]emes, exhibited to the public view by the white side only.

K__x, hast thou maturely deliberated, whether thou mayest not hereafter become an abbreviature of Cardinal Woolsey.

D. M'CLUSKEY.


* On my way to Savannah, to take my trial before the Federal Court--agreeable to recognizance, I was arrested by a state warrant, and am now confined in the place from whence I date. D. Mc.

Census:

Genealogy:

THE AUGUSTA CHRONICLE, 7/2/1791: "The rank and arrangement of the Militia of Elbert County, are established this day in the following order: ... James McCluskey, Esq. Capt. June 18, 1791 ..."
THE AUGUSTA CHRONICLE, 6/18/1796: "SHERIFF'S SALE. At Elbert court-house, on the first Tuesday in August next. WILL BE SOLD, 300 acres of land lying in Elbert county, on the waters of Blue Stone creek, more or less, joins John Rogers and Ware, it being the place where John H. Johnson now lives, with good improvements thereon; taken by execution as the property of John H. Johnson, to satisfy a judgment obtained by Benjamin Knox against David McCleskey and said Johnson.

"Conditions cash.

R. COSBY, S. E. C.

June 1, 1796."


Accused: Capt. David McCluskey
Ethnicity: [Scots]

Race: w


Gender: m

Age: adult

Literate:

Marital Status:

Children:

Occupation: planter

Town: ELBERT

Birthplace:

Religion:

Organizations: militia captain

Victim 1: ___
Ethnicity: Cherokee

Race: Ind

Gender: m

Age: adult

Literate:

Marital Status:

Children:

Occupation:

Town:

Birthplace:



Religion:

Organizations:


Victim 2: ___
Ethnicity: Cherokee

Race: Ind

Gender: m

Age: adult

Literate:

Marital Status:

Children:

Occupation:

Town:

Birthplace:



Religion:

Organizations:


1793, Apr. 17 FRA

P
Class: certain

Crime: HOM or WAR: 2 adults

Rela: NONDOM

Motive: POLITICAL

Intox?:


Day of week: W

Holiday?:

Time of day:

Days to death: 0 and [7]

S
Suspect(s
USPECT(s): three Cherokee men
VICTIM(s): ___ Towery and William Flemming

Weapon: prob. with knives & axes. T: killed and scalped. WF: "who received one wound through the arm, another in his hip, a third through his thigh, and though he made his escape, we are informed he is since dead."
Circumstances: T: on Chawgee creek, between Tugalo and Kiowee. WF: on Grove fork, of broad river. Both attacks occurred near the South Carolina frontier
Inquest:
Indictment: fled
Term:
Court proceedings:


Legal records:

Newspaper:
AC 4/27/1793: HOM by INDIANS in GA: Franklin Co.: "A party of Cherokees killed and scalped a man of the name of Towery, on Chawgee creek, between Tugalo and Kiowee, and carried off a number of horses, desperately wounded William Flemming, on Grove fork, of broad river, who received one wound through the arm, another in his hip, a third through his thigh, and though he made his escape, we are informed he is since dead. This murder was committed by three Cherokee Indians on or near the frontiers of South Carolina.

When this information was received, Gen. Twiggs, we hear, issued orders to the militia of his district, to hold themselves in immediate preparation to act according to such circumstances as might require the exertion of their valour."



Census:

Genealogy:
Accused: ___
Ethnicity: Cherokee

Race: Ind

Gender: m

Age: adult

Literate:

Marital Status:

Children:

Occupation:

Town:

Birthplace:



Religion:

Organizations:

Victim 1: ___ Towery
Ethnicity:

Race: w


Gender: m

Age: adult

Literate:

Marital Status:

Children:

Occupation: [farmer]

Town: FRA

Birthplace:

Religion:

Organizations:


Victim 2: William Flemming
Ethnicity:

Race: w


Gender: m

Age: adult

Literate:

Marital Status:

Children:

Occupation: [farmer]

Town: FRA

Birthplace:

Religion:

Organizations:


1793, Apr. 25 FRA

P
Class: probable

Crime: HOM or WAR: 2 adults

Rela: NONDOM

Motive: POLITICAL

Intox?:


Day of week: Th

Holiday?:

Time of day:

Days to death: [0]

S
Suspect(s
USPECT(s): Cherokee Indians
VICTIM(s): 2 men

Weapon:
Circumstances:
Inquest:
Indictment: fled
Term:
Court proceedings:


Legal records:

Newspaper:
Augusta Chronicle, 5/4/1793: "On Thursday the 25th inst. two men were killed in Franklin, 40 horses carried off, and since the accounts published in our last, all the inhabitants on the frontiers have retreated into forest without arms or ammunition, at one meeting of near 40 persons they could only muster 5 old muskets, to heighten the horror of their condition the Indians were momently expected.

As similar murders are daily committed it called upon the spirit of 800 gallant fellows, who have marched, last week, against the savages, determined to avenge the cruelties indiscriminately perpetrated on the infant, the mother, and the defenceless."



Census:

Genealogy:

Accused: ___


Ethnicity: Cherokee

Race: Ind

Gender: m

Age: adult

Literate:

Marital Status:

Children:

Occupation:

Town:

Birthplace:



Religion:

Organizations:

Victims: ___
Ethnicity:

Race: w


Gender: m

Age: adult

Literate:

Marital Status:

Children:

Occupation: [farmer]

Town: FRA

Birthplace:

Religion:

Organizations:


1795, Nov. 6 Fort Washington, FRA

P
Class: probable

Crime: HOM

Rela: NONDOM

Motive: POLTICAL / GENOCIDE

Intox?:


Day of week: F

Holiday?:

Time of day:

Days to death: [0]

S

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