Ana səhifə

National Recovery Plan for the Corangamite Water Skink Eulamprus tympanum marnieae Garry Peterson and Peter Robertson


Yüklə 0.7 Mb.
səhifə7/9
tarix27.06.2016
ölçüsü0.7 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9

Social and Economic Impacts


The implementation of this Recovery Plan will have minimal social and economic impact. Most populations of E. t. marnieae are on private land used mainly for agriculture. However, the area occupied by E. t. marnieae does not exceed 2% of any given landowner’s property and in most cases is less. The remaining rocky habitat occupied by the skink also has very little agricultural value, so E. t. marnieae is an ideal threatened species for landholders to retain and preserve on their properties with no net loss in agricultural productivity, as has been evidenced by the cooperative approach from several landowners involved in conservation efforts for this lizard (Peterson 2006). Given the sympathetic attitudes of many landholders in the region, it has been possible to modify agricultural practices in the small areas occupied by E. t. marnieae such that adverse impacts on the habitat have been mitigated with little, if any, net loss in agricultural productivity. Some areas of public land where the taxon occurs are used for recreation or other community activities, but conservation efforts (e.g. fencing, signage, track closures) will have minimal negative social impact.

There are considerable positive benefits in protecting E. t. marnieae habitats. The protection of these areas will augment intrinsic natural values enjoyed by visitors to such areas. These benefits complement the management aims of reserved land where this subspecies occurs, and visitors to these areas provide economic benefits for the local districts. Involving the community and private landholders in recovery efforts can foster a sense of pride in contributing to conservation programs and sense of ownership/responsibility for a threatened taxon present on their properties. Land acquisition to establish a system of managed reserves is extremely expensive, and may be possible in only a few instances. Conservation of E. t. marnieae must be viewed as a long-term and on-going process, to be achieved largely by sympathetic management of private lands via various agreements and management.


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


The authors would like to thank the following people for their contributions to this Recovery Plan: Gary Backhouse, Chris Banks, Nick Clemann, John Coventry, Steve Donnellan, Philip du Guesclin, Mark Hutchinson, Kim Lowe, Tony Mahoney, Brian Malone, Adrian Moorrees, James Ross and Michael Scroggie. Museum Victoria and the South Australian Museum also provided records of the Corangamite Water Skink.

REFERENCES


DEWHA. (2009). Natural Temperate Grassland of the Victorian Volcanic Plain: A nationally threatened ecological community. Policy Statement 3.8 Department of Environment, Water Resources, Heritage and the Arts, Canberra.

DNRE. (2002). Western District Lakes Ramsar Site: Strategic Management Plan Department of Natural Resources and Environment, East Melbourne.

Gibbs J. P. (1993). Importance of small wetlands for the persistence of local populations of wetland-associated animals. Wetlands 13(1), 25-31.

Hutchinson M. N. & Rawlinson P. A. (1995). The Water Skinks (Lacertilia: Eulamprus) of Victoria and South Australia. Records of the South Australian Museum 28(2), 185-207.

Joyce E. B. (1988). Newer Volcanic Landforms. In: Geology of Victoria (ed J. G. D. a. J. A. Ferguson) pp. 419-26. Jenkin Buxton, Melbourne.

Knights E. (2003). Home range and feeding ecology of the Corangamite Water Skink, Eulamprus tympanum marnieae. Unpublished B.Sc. Honours Thesis. La Trobe University, Bundoora.

Malone B. S. & Peterson G. N. L. (in prep). Spatial Ecology of the Endangered Corangamite Water Skink, Eulamprus tympanum marnieae, in Southern Australia. Wildlife Research.

NRE. (2003). Victoria's native vegetation management: A framework for action Department of Natural Resources and Environment, Melbourne.

Ollier C. D. & Joyce E. B. (1964). Volcanic physiography of the western plains of Victoria. Proceeding of the Royal Society of Victoria 77, 357-77.

Peterson, G. (1997) Personal observation. Department of Sustainability and Environment, Warrnambool, Victoria.

Peterson, G. (2010). Personal communication. Department of Sustainability and Environment, Warrnambool, Victoria.

Peterson G. (2004). Unpublished data. Department of Sustainability and Environment, Warrnambool, Victoria.

Peterson G. (2009). Unpublished data. Department of Sustainability and Environment, Warrnambool, Victoria.

Peterson G. (2010). Unpublished data. Department of Sustainability and Environment, Warrnambool, Victoria.

Peterson G. N. L. (1997). Ecology, Evolution and Conservation of the Eulamprus quoyii complex in Central Southwestern Victoria. Unpublished B.Sc. Honours Thesis. La Trobe University, Bundoora.

Peterson G. N. L. (1999). Distribution and conservation status of the Corangamite Water Skink (Eulamprus tympanum marnieae) on the Victorian Volcanic Plain. Final Report to the Research Advisory Group of the Grassy Ecosystem Reference Group. Melbourne.

Peterson G. N. L. (2000). Corangamite Water Skink (Dreeite) Recovery Plan, Research Phase. Annual Report to September 2000. Unpublished Report to the Endangered Species Program, Environment Australia, Canberra.

Peterson G. N. L. (2001). Corangamite Water Skink (Dreeite) Recovery Plan, Research Phase. Annual Report to September 2001. Unpublished Report to the Endangered Species Program, Environment Australia, Canberra.

Peterson G. N. L. (2002). Corangamite Water Skink (Dreeite) Recovery Plan, Research Phase. Annual Report to September 2002. Unpublished Report to the Endangered Species Program, Environment Australia., Canberra.

Peterson G. N. L. (2006). Corangamite Water Skink case study: Monitoring of modified management regimes. Threatened Species and Farming, Department of Sustainability and Environment, East Melbourne.

Robertson H. & Fitzsimons J. (2004). Dreeite Nature Conservation Reserve Management Statement Department of Sustainability and Environment, East Melbourne.

Robertson P. (1998). Recovery Plan for the Corangamite Water Skink (Eulamprus tympanum marnieae) Unpublished report to Environment Australia, Canberra.

Robertson P. & Lowe K. (1999). Corangamite Water Skink (Dreeite) - Ecology and Status Unpublished Report to the Endangered Species Program, Environment Australia, Canberra.

Robertson P. & Peterson G. N. L. (2000). Management Options and Guidelines for Eulamprus tympanum marnieae Sites. Unpublished discussion paper to the Corangamite Water Skink National Recovery Team, Melbourne.

Rohr D. H. (1997). Demographic and life-history variation in two proximate populations of a viviparous skink separated by a steep altitudinal gradient. Journal of Animal Ecology 66, 567-78.

Ross J. (1999). Identification of Priority Areas for Protection and Establishment of Protected Areas: Victorian Volcanic Plain Bioregion. Parks Flora and Fauna, Department of Natural Resources and Environment, Victoria, Melbourne.

Scott I. A. W. & Keogh J. S. (2003). Genetic variability within and between populations of Corangamite Water Skink (Eulamprus tympanum marnieae) and Southern Water Skink (Eulamprus tympanum tympanum) in western Victoria. Unpublished report to the Department of Natural Recourses and Environment, Melbourne. School of Botany and Zoology, Australian National University, Canberra.

Scroggie M. (2002). An assessment of monitoring requirements for the Corangamite Water Skink, Eulamprus tympanum marnieae. Department of Sustainability and Environment, Arthur Rylah Institute for Environmental Research, Melbourne.

Scroggie M. (2005). An analysis of monitoring data for the Corangamite Water Skink Eulamprus tympanum marnieae. Department of Sustainability and Environment, Arthur Rylah Institute for Environmental Research, Melbourne.

Sheldon R. A. (2005). Corangamite Wetlands Strategy 2006-2011. Corangamite Catchment Management Authority, Colac.

Skeats E. W. & James A. V. G. (1937). Basaltic barriers of Western Victoria. Proceedings of the Royal Society of Victoria 49(2), 245-78.

Sumner J. (2009). Personal communication. Museum Victoria, Melbourne.



Willis J. H. (1964). Vegetation of the basalt plains in western Victoria. Proceedings of the Royal Society of Victoria 77, 397-419.

1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©atelim.com 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət