Ana səhifə

Zoology brief Description of Junior and Senior Sophister Modules 2014-15


Yüklə 69.27 Kb.
tarix27.06.2016
ölçüsü69.27 Kb.


ZOOLOGY
Brief Description of Junior and Senior Sophister Modules 2014-15
Where more than one lecturer is involved, the name of the module coordinator is given in italics
ZO3000 Marine Biology
(5 credits – Michaelmas Term – 5 day field course plus 10 contact hours)
Module Personnel:

Prof. Jim Wilson, Dr Frank Jeal
Module Content:

This two-part module, which also serves as an introduction to the Zoology programme and Department, begins in week 5 with a residential field course, based at the Queen’s University marine facility at Portaferry, Co Down. The emphasis is on learning about the great variety of form and habit in marine organisms and the student is introduced to taxonomy and the morphology of many of the major invertebrate phyla, as well as more practical aspects of marine biology in general. This is then supplemented by a series of lectures throughout the Michaelmas Term, covering such topics as the variety of marine habitats; seasonal cycles and distribution of planktonic organisms; the sea shore and its zonation; hard and soft substrates; the benthos; seafloor sediments and infauna as well as such special habitats as the deep sea, coral reefs and polar waters, among others.


Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

1. Classify and map intertidal habitats and sketch zonation patterns on temperate rocky shores,


  1. Identify and draw a range of marine invertebrate and fish specimens and list the factors which control their distribution on the shore.

  2. Classify and map intertidal habitats.

  3. Know, in broad terms, the composition of seawater and describe the nature and role of marine plankton and the benthos.

5. Describe the basic ecological features of a range of special marine habitats.
Recommended Reading List:

Hayward, Peter, Nelson-Smith, Tony and Shields, Chris. 1996. (Collins Pocket Guide to the) Sea shore of Britain and Europe.

Publisher – HarperCollins, London (ISBN 0002199556)

Barnes, R.S.K. and Hughes, R.N. 1999. An Introduction to Marine Ecology (3rd edition).

Publisher – Blackwell Science, Oxford. (ISBN 0865428344 (pbk.))

Castro, Peter and Huber, Michael E. 2010. Marine Biology (8th edition)

Publisher – McGraw-Hill, New York
Assessment Details:

50% continuous assessment (based on field course notebooks and the level of general participation): 50% annual written examination.




ZO3003 Animal Diversity
(10 credits – Michaelmas Term – 80 contact hours)
Module Personnel:

Dr Ian Donohue, Prof. Jim Wilson, Dr Frank Jeal
Module Content:

This team-taught module provides a detailed consideration and comparison of the structure, life cycles and general biology of animal groups, based on lectures and practicals, with additional self-learning exercises. The practical work involves dissections, observation of living specimens, and demonstrations of material from the Zoological Department’s extensive collections. In the first part of the module (before the study week) the main themes will be the protostome coelomates, including the annelids, molluscs and arthropods, although other invertebrate taxa, including the minor phyla, are also covered. After the study week, the emphasis shifts to the vertebrates and their nearest relatives (the deuterostome coelomates). Morphological adaptations and evolutionary aspects of the vertebrate groups will be exemplified by skeletal and preserved material, made available for examination by the students.


Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

1. Organise the invertebrates into a phylogenetic dendrogram and list the diagnostic ID features of the major invertebrate taxa.

2. Give examples of the following levels of organization – Protists; Mesozoa and Parazoa; diploblasts and triplobasts; acoelomates, pseudocoelomates and coelomates – and sketch the diagnostic body plan/structure and function (‘Bauplan’) of the major taxa

3. Give examples of the major taxa and their relative importance/abundance and summarise the ecological importance and niche of selected exemplars.

4. Explain recent views on the origins of the vertebrates and appreciate the palaeontological, anatomical and genetic evidence for such views

5. Describe the basic anatomy, and adaptive features of the vertebrate classes and give a reasoned identification of representative specimens of the classes (and in some cases orders & families) of the vertebrates.

6. Review the palaeontological evidence for such evolutionary transitions as the conquest of the land by tetrapods; the origin and radiation of amniotes; the evolutionary transition from dinosaurs to birds, and the evolution of endothermy and the mammals

7. Report the recent classification of the mammals together with the biogeographical and molecular evidence for this classification.
Recommended Reading List:

Brusca, Richard C. And Brusca, Gary J. 2003. Invertebrates (2nd edition)

Publisher – Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, Mass. (ISBN 0878930973)

Kardong, Kenneth V. 2012. Vertebrates: comparative anatomy, function, evolution (6th edition) Publisher – McGraw-Hill, New York, N.Y. (ISBN 9780071086554)


Assessment Details:

50% continuous assessment (including 2 practical spot-tests): 50% annual written examination.



ZO3020 Behavioural Ecology
(5 credits – Hilary Term – 30 Contact Hours)
Module Personnel:

Dr N. Marples


Module Content:

This lecture and practical module gives a broad grounding in the theoretical and practical basis of behavioural ecology. The subject is introduced with an overview of the diverse influences on an animal’s behaviour. Following this, the roles of perception and attention in learning are explored, before moving on to a more classic behavioural ecology course, covering how animals obtain food, avoid predators, breed and communicate. The practical work provides students with experience in studying behaviour in both the field and the laboratory, and provides training in behavioural recording techniques. It guides students through appropriate statistical analysis of the data sets collected in the practicals, and in their presentation in written form. It includes work with live animals both in the laboratory and at Dublin Zoo.




Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

1. Outline the basic principles of behavioural ecology supported by a number of experimental examples

2. Appreciate the uses of theoretical modelling relating to behavioural studies.

3. Recognise the breadth of influences on an animal’s behaviour.

4. Have experience of the practical aspects of studying animal behaviour and the ability to design and carry out quantitative behavioural observations.

5. Carry out, analyse and write up simple experiments on animal behaviour.

6. Appreciate the use of the most common statistical tests used in behavioural analysis.


Recommended Reading List:

Krebs, John R. and Davies, Nicholas B. 1993. An Introduction to Behavioural Ecology (3rd edition) Publisher – Blackwell Science, Oxford. (ISBN 0632035463)


Alcock, John. 2009. Animal Behaviour: An Evolutionary Approach (9th edition)

Publisher – Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, Mass. (ISBN 9780878932252)


Barnard, Christopher J. 2003. Animal Behaviour: Mechanism, Development, Function and Evolution.

Publisher – Prentice Hall, Harlow. (ISBN 0130899364)


Assessment Details:

50% continuous assessment: 50% annual written examination.




ZO3030 Introduction to Parasitology
(5 credits – Hilary Term – 30 Contact Hours)
Module Personnel:

Prof. C. Holland


Module Content:

The significance of the host-parasite relationship and the processes associated with the definition of parasitism are discussed in this module. Examples from important parasite phyla are reviewed with a focus upon life cycle strategies, ecology, pathology and control. The epidemiology of parasitic diseases including important differences between microparasites and macroparasites are defined. The significance of parasite distributions within host populations is highlighted. External and internal factors, which influence parasite populations, are outlined and particular attention is paid to host behaviour, genetics and immunity. The concept of a parasite community at the infracommunity and component community level is developed. The practical work provides access to a wide range of parasitic material and gives emphasis to the diversity of parasitic lifestyles and forms. A number of the sessions are experimental in nature and explore parasitic adaptations for infection, the significance of parasite distributions in infected hosts, behavioural changes in parasitised hosts and the nature of parasite communities.


Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this module, the student will be able to:

1. Know the broad context of the host-parasite relationship and recall key definitions of parasitism.

2. Identify a range of parasites from four major groups and recognize the epidemiological differences between microparasites and macroparasites

3. Explore three internal factors that influence parasite populations and develop an understanding of strategies for parasite control.

4. Locate and identify parasites from a range of hosts in the laboratory and simulate parasite activation.

5. Sample hosts for parasite community analyses.

6. Design experiments on the impact of parasitism upon host fitness and write up the results of a laboratory experiment in the form of a scientific paper.


Recommended Reading List:

Bush, Albert O., Fernández, Jacqueline C., Esch, Gerard W. and Seed, J.Richard. 2001. Parasitism: The Diversity and Ecology of Animal Parasites.

Publisher – Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. (ISBN 0521662788/0521664470)
Assessment Details:

50% continuous assessment (practical write-up): 50% annual written examination.



ZO3040 Comparative Physiology
(5 credits – Michaelmas Term – 35 Contact Hours)
Module Personnel:

Prof. P. Wilson, Dr M. Wride


Module Content:

This module includes lectures and a practical component, including demonstrations, histology and hands-on dissection, using examples drawn from the animal kingdom. Living animals adjust their physiological mechanisms to successfully deal with the environment, which is their natural habitat. Various adaptations are explored based on, for example, the adaptations of the respiratory system that enable some mammals to dive deep into the ocean to feed, the adaptation of the excretory system that enable animals to survive in arid conditions. The systems are compared in mammals, reptiles, fishes and birds.


Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this module, the student will be able to:

1. Describe the mechanisms that different animals use to carry out respiration, thermoregulation, excretion, homeostasis, digestion and reproduction.

2. Describe the comparative physiology and anatomy of the cardiovascular systems and nervous system.

3. Outline the nature of the special senses, focusing on the comparative physiology of the eye in different animals.
Recommended Reading List:

Randall, David J., Burggren, Warren and French, Kathleen. 2002. Eckert Animal Physiology: mechanisms and adaptations (5th edition)

Publisher – W.H. Freeman and Co. New York, NY. (ISBN 0716738635)
Kardong, Kenneth V. 2012. Vertebrates: comparative anatomy, function, evolution (6th edition) Publisher – McGraw-Hill, New York, N.Y. (ISBN 9780071086554)

Hill, Richard W., Wyse, Gordon A. and Anderson, Margaret. 2008 Animal Physiology (2nd edition)

Publisher – Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke (ISBN 9780878933174)
Assessment Details:

50% continuous assessment: 50% annual written examination.



ZO3050 Introduction to Developmental Biology
(5 credits – Michaelmas Term – 35 Contact Hours)

Module Personnel:

Dr P. Murphy



Module Content:

This module consists of a series of lectures, tutorials and practical sessions that deals with a range of

topics in Developmental Biology emphasising a molecular approach to understanding the principles of

animal development. A number of animal model systems will be dealt with and the contribution of each to

our overall understanding of development discussed. Specific topics will include the following:

Developmental genetics: the identification of genes that regulate development in Drosophila and

vertebrates; Positional determination: how the body plan of the embryo is laid down including the role of

homeo-box genes; Induction: the role of cell and tissue interactions and signalling cascades;

Developmental neurobiology: positional determination within the vertebrate central nervous system,

neuronal diversity and axonal guidance, neural crest cells and development of the peripheral nervous

system. Other topics include limb development, organogenesis, and evolutionary developmental biology.

Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this module, the student will be able to:

1. Describe the key principles of embryonic development.

2. Describe the model animals that are used for developmental studies and explain why they have

been so important.

3. Describe the key events in building a complex multicellular animal (the common and species-specific

features).

4. Integrate an understanding of molecular control of cell differentiation and the key molecules involved

with morphological events in the embryo (e.g. the molecules associated with neural tube patterning).

5. Observe and identify key features of vertebrate embryos and use morphological criteria to uncover

the stage of embryonic development.

6. Identify internet resources that aid modern developmental research and, working in groups, carry out

desk-top research using genome project resources.

7. Demonstrate improved their writing and presentation skills through tutorial assignments and

feedback

Recommended Reading List:

Gilbert, Scott F. 2010. Developmental Biology (9th edition)

Publisher – Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, Mass. (ISBN 9780878933846 (pbk.)/9780878935642 (hbk.))

Wolpert, Lewis and Tickle, Cheryll. 2011. Principles of Development (4th edition)

Publisher – Oxford University Press, Oxford. (ISBN 9780199549078 (pbk.)/9780199554287 (hbk.))

Assessment Details:

50% continuous assessment (laboratory report and tutorial assignments): 50% annual written

examination.

ZO3070 Experimental Design and Analysis
(5 credits – Hilary Term – 28 Contact Hours – Core Module)
Module Personnel:

Prof. C. Holland


Module Content:

This module, designed specifically for Zoologists, Functional Biologists, Plant Scientists and Environmental Scientists will aim to put data collection and analysis in the context of research design and will be an important foundation for the Senior Sophister research project. The module consists of two parts. The emphasis will be practical with a more

'hands on' approach rather than the theory of statistics. Initially students will be taught about experimental design, data collection and sampling and the use of spreadsheets for data entry. This will lead on to preliminary data exploration and issues of normality. Emphasis will be placed upon the importance of visually exploring the data prior to the use of statistical tests. Summary statistics, including measures of centre and spread, skewness, kurtosis, percentiles and boxplots, will be covered. Then the module will move on to explore the concept of hypothesis testing and the need to compare two or more means. This will involve the use of t-tests and analysis of variance. Other types of data will also be introduced including the analysis of frequencies. The relationship between two variables in the context of regression analysis will also be explored. Finally a data set will be used to bring the entire process together starting with simple data exploration through summary statistics to more complex analyses.

The aim of the second part of the module is to address, in more detail, the fundamentals of experimental design and to explore how previous projects were conducted. In addition, students will learn how to write a moderatorship project proposal.



Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this module, the student will be able to:

1. Address the fundamentals of experimental design and use hypothesis testing to answer biological questions.

2. Appreciate instruments for data collection, and how to explore and analyse data within the context of research design.

3. Code data using an Excel spreadsheet and explore these data using graphical and summary techniques.

4. Outline the requirements of parametric statistical tests and recognize the applicability of four such tests.

5. Calculate statistical tests by hand and use the statistical package R to explore and analyse data.

6. Write a moderatorship project proposal, design an experiment and analyse the findings of a scientific paper in a group setting.


Recommended Reading List:

Ruxton, Graeme D. and Colegrave, Nick. 2011. Experimental design for the life sciences (3rd edition) Publisher – Oxford University Press, Oxford (ISBN 9780199569120).


Assessment Details:

50% continuous assessment (three assessments – data analysis exercise (Part 1), designing an experiment, writing a moderatorship project proposal (Part 2). 50% annual written examination.



ZO3085 Wildlife Biology
(5 credits – Hilary Term – 5 day field course plust 15 contact hours)
Module Personnel:

Dr John Rochford, Dr Nicola Marples
Module Content:

This two-part module begins with a series of lectures in Hilary Term, which offer an introduction to the field of Wildlife Biology, both globally and regionally. Topics covered will include: wildlife as individuals, populations and communities, foraging ecology, habitat selection, inter- and intra-specific competition, territoriality, dispersion, population dynamics and regulation. There will also be a short survey of the origins, development and current status of the Irish vertebrate fauna. The lecture series will be complemented, in week 34, by a week-long residential field course in Glendalough, Co Wicklow, during which field techniques used for the study of terrestrial ecosystems will be introduced, with an emphasis on population assessment of mammals, insects and birds. Field visits will help with an understanding of contrasting habitats and conservation management. Students will carry out and present a mini-project during the last two days of the course.


Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this elective, the student will be able to:

1. Demonstrate the relationship between wildlife biology and the practice of wildlife management and conservation

2 Recognise and evaluate the main factors influencing the conservation status of species, in particular habitat selection and requirements, population processes and interspecific interactions

3. Explain the origin, diversity and status of the current Irish vertebrate fauna.

4. Census mammals and insects safely using a variety of the most commonly used methods, and birds by sight and song.

5. Construct habitat maps and appreciate the importance of scale in such maps.

6. Assess anthropogenic effects on the environment and evaluate some control measures used to minimise them in nature reserves.

7. Design, conduct and present a small scale field study investigating an ecological question.
Recommended Reading List:

Primack, Richard B. 2010. Essentials of Conservation Biology (5th edition).

Publisher – Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, Mass. (ISBN 9780878936403)

Groom, Martha J., Meffe, G.K. and Carroll, C.R. 2006. Principles of Conservation Biology (3rd edition). Publisher – Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, Mass. (ISBN 0878935185)


Assessment Details:

50% continuous assessment (based on project, field notebook and presentation, all completed during the course): 50% annual written examination.



ZO4011: Advances in Developmental Biology

Module Personnel:

Prof. Paula Murphy

A set of 5 specific topics in the field of Developmental Biology will be explored in detail looking at current research findings and their wider relevance to biomedical research. The topics for 2013/2014 will include 1) cell differentiation and stem cells; 2) human embryo technology; the facts and the myths; 3) Transgenic animal models for biomedical research; 4) mechanical regulation of embryonic development and 5) limb patterning and evolution. The module will consist of 10 2 hour tutorial sessions where students will participate by preparing, presenting and discussing research papers.


Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this module, the student will be able to:

1. effectively read a research paper and assimilate the data it contains into their general knowledge about specific areas of biology- particularly Developmental Biology

2. question the assertions made in a research paper and discuss if the data presented support the conclusions drawn

3. demonstrate familiarity with the proposal of testable models to explain experimental data and the concept of progressing our understanding of a complex system through the proposal and modification of models.

4. prepare and deliver short presentations to effectively communicate the content and conclusions from a piece of primary research, including the presentation of arguments in a debate setting.

5. distinguish between the features and goals of scientific writing and popular journalism.

6. discuss in depth aspects of a series of specific topics in the areas of Stem cell research, animal cloning, use of transgenic animal models for biomedical research and limb patterning.

7. work in groups to review, discuss and debate on the above topics
Assessment Details:

This module is assessed 100% by questions on an annual examination paper.



ZO4012: Advances in Parasitology

Module Personnel:

Prof. Celia Holland

This module consists of two parts.

The first part (A) explores the significance and impact of parasitism upon humans. Some of the topics discussed during the module illuminate the practical challenges of designing and undertaking parasitological research in human subjects. In contrast, other topics highlight the relative merits of using animal model systems under experimental conditions as compared to field-based studies in human subjects. The topics are as follows - the impact of parasitism upon cognitive development in growing children; co-infection: challenges and solutions; epidemiology of helminths: aggregation and

predisposition; the ultimate challenge - parasite control.


The second part (B) focuses upon more ecological aspects of Parasitology with a particular emphasis upon the impact of parasites at the level of the ecosystem and within wild animal hosts. The topics include parasites as ecosystem engineers, parasites and introduced species, parasite communities and the significance of interspecific interactions and the use of wild mammal host-parasite systems to model human parasitism.
Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this elective, the student will be able to:

1. demonstrate familiarity with the conduct of human studies under field conditions in developing countries

2. describe the impact of parasitism upon human hosts

3. explore the pros and cons of using animal models in parasitological studies

4. delineate the mechanisms of interaction between co-infections

5. define parasite aggregation and predisposition

6. identify the challenges associated with anti-parasite chemotherapy and vaccination

7. evaluate the use of wild rodent parasite communities as models of human infection

8. understand the role of parasites in an ecosystem

9. assess the role of introduced host species in parasite transmission

10. explain the current understanding of parasite community structure

11. demonstrate the skills to critique a scientific paper

12. discuss and debate various contributions to a particular topic


Assessment Details:

This module is assessed 100% by questions on an annual examination paper.



ZO4013: Conservation and Wildlife Management

Module Personnel:

Prof. John Rochford, Prof. Peter Wilson

This module, which consists of both lectures and tutorials, looks at some of the practical applications of wildlife biology to the conservation and management of animals, both in- and ex-situ, including the role of zoos in captive breeding programmes. Among the topics covered are: planning for wildlife management, wildlife survey and census techniques, the principles of managing wildlife for sustainable harvest or control, management of scarce or endangered species, practical issues associated with the ex-situ management of species, and the design and management of conservation areas. In the second part of the module, we will concentrate on anthropogenic impacts on biodiversity conservation, including the development and implementation of biodiversity conservation strategies in the wake of the Convention on Biological Diversity, other national and international wildlife legislation, biosecurity and the role of Invasive Alien Species, Biological Data Management and the development of Species Action Plans, and the role of reintroductions in biodiversity conservation.


Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this elective, the student will be able to:

1. outline the goals and history of sustainable wildlife management

2. determine and evaluate strategies for exploitation and control of animal resources

3. implement techniques for establishing and maintaining the conservation status of species

4. describe the relationship between in- and ex-situ conservation measures

5. evaluate the selection, design and management of protected areas for wildlife
Recommended Reading List:

Primack, Richard B. 2010. Essentials of Conservation Biology (5th edition).

Publisher – Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, Mass. (ISBN 9780878936403)
Groom, Martha J., Meffe, G.K. and Carroll, C.R. 2006. Principles of Conservation Biology (3rd edition). Publisher – Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, Mass. (ISBN 0878935185)
Assessment Details:

This module is assessed 20% by continuous assessment and 80% by questions on an annual examination paper.



ZO4014: Environmental Oceanography and Marine Biology

Module Personnel:

Prof. Jim Wilson, Prof. Frank Jeal

The first part of this module looks at four main topics of a rather general nature (e.g. coral reefs, polar ecology, marine migration etc.). Following the study week, the second part of this module looks in detail at a number of the major environmental issues in the marine ecosystem. It is based around the topics of climate change, eutrophication, fisheries and biodiversity. In each topic we will look at the background to the problem, the theories and evidence on which investigations are based and the current thinking on the way forward. The tutorials will take the form of a general discussion (with references handout) in the first session followed by a closer look at recent literature, selected and presented by the students, in the second.


Learning outcomes:

On successful completion of this elective, the student will be able to:

1. list the major consequences of global climate change on the oceans

2. chart the transfers of nutrients through the ocean systems

3. predict the consequences of changes in nutrient input into selected systems

4. construct simple stock models for fisheries

5. apply games theory to fisheries science

6. link system properties in the oceanic environment

7. demonstrate an awareness of the role of the oceans in the maintenance of biodiversity.
Assessment Details:

This module is assessed 100% by questions on an annual examination paper.



ZO4016: Eyes & Vision - Evolution, Development and Comparative Physiology

Module Personnel:

Prof. Mike Wride

Darwin described the eye as one of his “Organs of Extreme Perfection and Complication” in the Origin of Species. This module covers the molecular genetic basis of eye evolution and development and relates this to diseases, including lens and retinal defects causing blindness. Topics include a cross-species examination of eye evolution, including consideration of the ‘Light-Switch Theory’ that the acquisition by animals of the ability to detect and respond to light contributed towards the Cambrian explosion (the rapid appearance of most major groups of animals 530 million years ago); the molecular genetic basis of eye/lens development and disease will be discussed, including the role of Pax6 (the so-called master regulator) in eye development. Then, the molecular genetic basis of binocular vision (i.e. why we have two eyes) will be examined, including consideration of important molecules such as Wnt/frizzled signaling and the involvement of genes, such as sonic hedgehog and cyclops. Finally, the potential of the lens to regenerate in fish and newts will be considered and the potential to use stem cells in the eye for ocular disease therapy will be discussed.


Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this elective, the student will be able to:

1. describe eye evolution and development at the embryological and molecular level.

2. outline the structure and function of eyes in different invertebrate and vertebrate species from a comparative perspective.

3. outline the neurological basis of vision and visual processing from the eye to the brain

4. review the nature of various diseases causing blindness and the basis of therapies being developed to treat such diseases e.g. stem cells.


Assessment Details

This module is assessed 20% by continuous assessment and 80% by questions on an annual examination paper.





Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©atelim.com 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət