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Windows Logo Program


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WL-5. System and components meet reduced legacy support goals


The following legacy-reduction goals are defined for the Windows Logo Program for hardware.

Hardware Legacy Reduction Requirements


Retail components and components included with a system must not use the ISA expansion bus. The system must not include ISA expansion slots.

For desktop and mobile systems, peripherals that use the parallel or serial ports cannot be included with the system. The ports themselves are still allowed to allow connectivity for legacy hardware the user might already have.

Devices that use Super I/O and that are resource managed by ACPI are acceptable. The important issue is that Super I/O is not a legacy component in itself; however, fixing resources to Super I/O is a legacy implementation that was traditionally used before ACPI.

Software Legacy Reduction Requirements


All software included with a system or peripheral device must be Microsoft Win32®- or Win64™-based software. The software must not require MS-DOS®-based decompression or installers.

Windows Me Legacy Reduction Requirements


Drivers and utilities must not run in real mode under Windows Me, and must not use Config.sys or Autoexec.bat for configuration or for launching related software.

This requirement does not apply for the emergency recovery software, system or component pre-configuration software, or boot device software.


Legacy-Free PC System Requirements


A PC system is not required to be legacy-free to receive the “Designed for Windows” logo. A PC system is considered legacy free under the Windows Logo Program if it meets the following basic criteria:

  • The LEGACY_DEVICES flag is set to 0 in the Fixed ACPI Description Table (FADT).

  • Operating system detection software does not report the presence of Super I/O-dependent components (with exceptions for 8042 controllers).

  • No components claim to use the restricted port addresses.

The complete hardware and BIOS requirements for Windows-compatible, legacy-free design are described in Appendix A, "System Requirements Checklist," including exceptions and issues for mobile PCs.


WL-6. System and components support operating system configuration and control of devices


The goal for this requirement is correct support for complete operating system management of system configuration and behavior. This requirement applies for all BIOS, bus, and device components in a system. In particular, this includes:

  • Windows 2000-ready, ACPI-compliant BIOS.

  • Correct implementation of Plug and Play and power management.

This requirement is based on fundamental operating system requirements, industry specifications, and Windows DDK implementation guidelines for Plug and Play and other functional capabilities of the operating system.

For details about operating system compatibility and design guidelines, see Appendix A, "System Requirements Checklist."

WL-7. System and peripherals implement ease-of-use guidelines for a good end-user experience


The following basic ease-of-use guidelines are cited for the Windows Logo:

  • Connections use icons, plus keyed or shrouded connectors.

Color-coding is not required. Suggestions for icons and color codes are listed at http://www.pcdesguide.org/documents/icons.htm.

  • Minimal user interaction is needed to install and configure devices, which is ensured by following the device installation guidelines defined in the Windows DDKs.

  • Driver and utility installation do not require a system reboot, unless required by the operating system.

Installation of a component should not require a reboot when installed on a system where no applications are running.

Implementation Guidelines:
Installing Drivers and Utilities without Rebooting on Windows 2000 at http://www.microsoft.com/hwdev/PlugnPlay/no_reboot.htm

WL-8. System components operate correctly upon installation of a later operating system


  • System manufacturers must clearly communicate their support commitments to their customers. Customers base purchase decisions on the operating systems listed on the logo; they expect that if a system carries a “Designed for Microsoft Windows” logo with two operating systems listed that the system will support both operating systems. The requirements defined here support that customer expectation.

  • Important: System manufacturers must support the preinstalled operating system and any operating system listed on the "Designed for Microsoft Windows" Logo.

Basic Support and Best Practices


1. System manufacturers must provide instructions for each of the supported Microsoft operating system installation-and-recovery scenarios.

If the manufacturer makes the commitment to support only system restoration from recovery media or the installation of an operating system on an empty hard drive, then this level of support must be clearly communicated.

The system manufacturer must provide an “operating system version support” status report for each model or model family; the report must include a list of the previously available preinstallations for each of the Windows operating systems since the time that model or model family was released to manufacturing. The “operating system version support” status report must clearly communicate the manufacturer’s support commitment, including supported clean installs and upgrades, availability of drivers, and utilities required to maintain functionality after installation of an operating system.

2. For operating system installations supported by the system manufacturer, a help file must be made available.

The help file must contain complete instructions for the end user about system preparation and changes to the BIOS, applications, and drivers that must be completed before installing an operating system on the PC.



3. A Logo'd system and its components must be fully functional after installation of a supported operating system version.

This requirement is specific to installations in the same class of operating system, for example, desktop-to-desktop or server-to-server.

In particular, consider a system that comes preinstalled with Windows Me. When Windows XP Home Edition is installed, all features present under Windows Me that are supported in Windows XP Home Edition must be fully operational.

Installing Windows XP or Windows 2000


OEMs must support installing Windows XP on systems that display any of the following “Designed for Microsoft Windows XP” logos:

“Designed for Windows XP” logo


“Designed for Windows XP and Windows 2000 Professional” logo
“Designed for Windows XP and Windows Me” logo
“Designed for Windows XP and Windows 98 Second Edition” logo

Similarly, OEMs must support installing Windows Whistler Server on systems that display any of the following the “Designed for Microsoft Windows Whistler Server” logos:

“Designed for Windows Whistler Server” logo
“Designed for Windows Whistler Server and Windows 2000 Server” logo

Customer Support Requirements


These requirements apply to systems that display the logos listed earlier in “Installing Windows XP or Windows 2000.”

1. System includes Windows 2000-ready, ACPI-compliant BIOS.

Related information is available at http://www.microsoft.com/hwdev/onnow/.



2. Supported features are functional after installation.

  • Features supported in Windows 2000 and present on a system must be fully operational after the installation of Windows XP.

  • Features supported in Windows Millennium and present on a system must be fully operational after the installation of Windows XP.

  • Features supported in Windows XP Home Edition and present on a system must be fully operational after the installation of Windows XP Professional.

3. OEM preinstalled system applications and utilities are "Windows XP/Windows 2000 ready."

System applications, utilities and system tray applets that are included with a system must be capable of running after the system is installed with either Windows 2000 or Windows XP, unless that functionality is supported natively in the operating system.

OEMs should provide access to up-to-date application files for customers who perform ‘clean’ operating system installations, or for customers who do not have access to internet-based help and support, as well as for customers who have access to the Internet.

Internet Availability Requirement for Preinstalled Software. Customer-support must be provided by making available Internet downloads of migration DLLs, patches, or replacement software applications. In addition, preinstall a link to a URL for the manufacturer’s support web site that contains the migration DLLs, patches, or replacement software which the user needs to ensure that all preinstalled applications run after installing Windows 2000 or Windows XP. This web site must be available and populated with correct files when the system is available to end users.

Non-Internet Availability Recommendations for Preinstalled Software. Any one or more of the following solutions can be implemented to provide customer-support in non-Internet-connected scenarios:


  • Preinstalled application is already “Windows 2000 and Windows XP ready.”

  • Place a new Windows 2000-compatible version of the application on the hard disk. The user can reinstall the application after migrating to either Windows 2000 or Windows XP.

  • Place any necessary patch files on the hard disk. The user can run these "fixes" after migrating to Windows XP/Windows 2000.

  • Place a migration dynamic-link library (DLL) on the hard disk. The Microsoft General Device Driver Pack Migration DLL is available at http://www.microsoft.com/hwdev/driver/.
    See also http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/techart/msdn_migdbg.htm.

  • Provide application media to customers upon request.

Note: OEMs are not required to provide applications from third parties that were licensed for a particular preinstalled operating system version. In this case, the OEM must provide a notice to show where their customers can obtain versions for the later operating system.

4. Preinstalled devices are “Windows 2000 ready” or “Windows XP ready.”

For any device that does not have a driver included as part of the Windows 2000 product, a signed Windows XP/Windows 2000 driver must be available to the user.

For those devices where it is not feasible to provide common Windows XP/Windows 2000 driver files, providing operating system-specific signed drivers is acceptable; drivers must be provided for each of the operating systems supported. OEMs should provide access to up-to-date signed driver files for customers who perform ‘clean’ operating system installations and for customers who do not have access to Internet-based help and support, as well as for customers who have access to the Internet.

Internet Availability Requirement for Preinstalled Drivers. Customer-support must be provided by making available Internet downloads of signed drivers. In addition, preinstall a link to a URL for the manufacturer’s support web site that contains the drivers required during and after migrating to Windows 2000 or Windows XP. This web site must be available and populated with signed driver files when the system is available to end users.

Non-Internet Availability Recommendations for Preinstalled Drivers. Any one or more of the following solutions can be used to provide customer-support in non-Internet-connected scenarios:


  • Place signed Windows 2000 and Windows XP drivers on the hard disk drive, so that the user can reinstall the driver after migrating to Windows 2000 or Windows XP.

Note: If you provide drivers on the system hard disk drive, the drivers can be in any directory other than \INF, \system32, or \system. Also, you must provide the end-user with a migration DLL, as described in the Windows DDK or on the web at http://www.microsoft.com/hwdev/driver/WinH2kDrv.htm.

  • Provide signed drivers for Windows 2000 and Windows XP drivers for posting on Windows Update site.

  • Provide media in the “as shipped” system’s packaging to support migrating to Windows 2000 and Windows XP.

  • Provide media to the customer upon request.


5. All features in custom utilities are available after installation of Windows 2000 or Windows XP.

For all manufacturer-provided utilities preinstalled on the system, one of the following conditions must be met:



  • If no user functionality is lost after installing Windows 2000 or Windows XP, the utility can be removed or turned off. This case applies when built-in Windows 2000 or Windows XP features such as ACPI-based power management replace functionality that the manufacturer provided under Windows NT 4.0 through custom utilities.

- OR -

  • If user functionality is lost, the manufacturer must provide customer support as described earlier in the item “Preinstalled applications and utilities are ‘Windows XP/Windows 2000 ready.’”


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