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Weapons training battalion marine corps combat development command quantico, virginia


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UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS

WEAPONS TRAINING BATTALION

MARINE CORPS COMBAT DEVELOPMENT COMMAND

QUANTICO, VIRGINIA 22134 5040



INSTRUCTOR GUIDE


CORRECTIVE ACTION WITH A SERVICE RIFLE

0300-M16-1003

0300-M16-1017 (REV.)

ANNUAL RIFLE TRAINING POI



APPROVAL____________________________ DATE______________


(SLIDE #1)
INTRODUCTION (3 MIN)
1. GAIN ATTENTION: Knowledge of the procedures to correctly and efficiently perform corrective actions on the rifle when a malfunction has occurred is an essential skill for every Marine. If the rifle will not perform its cycle of operations it becomes nothing more than dead weight. The Marine is now in a bad situation and if the proper procedures are not followed to correct the malfunction it may cost the individual their life, as well as the lives of their fellow Marines.
Notes:__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

(SLIDE #2)
2. OVERVIEW: Good morning/afternoon my name is .


INSTRUCTOR’S NOTE:
HAVE SELECTED SHOOTERS READ ALOUD THE LEARNING OBJECTIVES FROM THEIR HANDOUTS.

This lesson will cover the cycle of operation for the service rifle, types of stoppages and malfunctions, indicators, and corrective action in the event of a stoppage/malfunction. The purpose of this period of instruction is to provide you with the knowledge and skills necessary to fix a stoppage/malfunction, if it occurs, in order to get your service rifle back to its normal operation.
(SLIDE #3)
3. INTRODUCE LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
a. TERMINAL LEARNING OBJECTIVE:
(1) Given a service rifle that has stopped firing and ammunition, perform corrective action with a service rifle to return the weapon to service. (0300-M16-1003)
(SLIDE #4)
b. ENABLING LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
(1) Given a service rifle that has stopped firing and ammunition, perform corrective action with a service rifle, examine the cycle of operations. (0300-M16-1003a)
(SLIDE #5)
(2) Given a service rifle that has stopped firing and ammunition, perform corrective action with a service rifle, to clear a stoppage or malfunction. (0300-M16-1003b)
(SLIDE #6)
(3) Given a service rifle that has stopped firing and ammunition, perform corrective action with a service rifle, perform audible pop procedures. (0300-M16-1003c)
(SLIDE #7)
4. METHOD/MEDIA: This period of instruction will be taught using the informal lecture method, aided by the PowerPoint, demonstration and practical application.
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5. EVALUATION: Students will be evaluated by performance based evaluation.
6. SAFETY/CEASE TRAINING (CT) BRIEF: As per ORAW.
(SLIDE #8)
TRANSITION: Are there any questions about the learning objectives, the method of instruction, or how you will be evaluated? Every rifle has a specific cycle that it must perform to operate efficiently and effectively. This cycle is known as the cycle of operations.
BODY (40 MIN)
(SLIDE #9) (14 MIN)
1. CYCLE OF OPERATIONS: Any deviation from any of these steps can cause a malfunction or deficiency in the weapons ability to fire the round. The cycle of operations for the service rifle is:
a. Firing: The hammer releases and strikes the head of the firing pin, driving the firing pin into the round’s primer. The primer ignites the powder in the cartridge. Gas generated by the rapid burning of powder propels the projectile through the barrel. After the projectile passes the gas port, a portion of the expanding gas enters the gas port and gas tube. The gas tube directs the gas rearward into the bolt carrier key and causes the bolt carrier to move rearward.
b. Unlocking: As the bolt carrier moves to the rear, the bolt cam pin follows the path of the cam track located in the bolt carrier. This causes the bolt assembly to rotate until the bolt-locking lugs are no longer aligned behind the barrel extension locking lugs.
c. Extracting: As the bolt carrier group continues to move to the rear, the extractor claw withdraws the cartridge case from the chamber.
d. Ejecting: The ejector, located in the bolt face, is compressed into the bolt body by the base of the cartridge case. The rearward movement of the bolt carrier group allows the nose of the cartridge case to clear the front of the ejection port. The cartridge case is thrown out by the action of the ejector and spring.
e. Cocking: Continuing its rearward travel, the bolt carrier overrides the hammer, forces it down into the receiver, compresses the hammer spring, and causes it to disconnect or to engage the lower hammer hook.
f. Feeding: Once rearward motion causes the bolt carrier

group to clear the top of the magazine, the expansion of the magazine spring forces a round into the path of the bolt. After the buffer spring overcomes and absorbs the rearward motion of the bolt carrier group, it expands and sends the buffer assembly and bolt carrier group forward with enough force to strip a round from the magazine.


g. Chambering: As the bolt carrier group continues to move forward, pushing a fresh round in front of it, the face of the bolt thrusts the new round into the chamber. The extractor claw grips the rim of the cartridge case. The ejector is forced into its hole, compressing the ejector spring.
h. Locking: As the bolt carrier group continues to move forward, the bolt-locking lugs are forced against the barrel extension and the bolt cam pin is forced along the cam track. The bolt rotates and aligns the bolt locking lugs behind the barrel extension locking lugs. The weapon is ready to fire.

TRANSITION: Now that we have covered the cycle of operation are there any questions? I have one for you.
QUESTION: What does the feeding step of the cycle of operations incorporate?
ANSWER: Feeding the round from the magazine to the chamber.
let’s move onto what happens if the cycle of operations is interrupted by malfunctions and stoppages.
(SLIDE #10) (13 MIN)
2. MALFUNCTIONS AND STOPPAGES: Malfunctions and stoppages are two different occurrences that can happen to the rifle that causes the rifle not to fire.
a. MALFUNCTION: A malfunction occurs when a part of the rifle fails to operate as designed or intended. A malfunction will need to be fixed by an armorer or a qualified individual.
b. STOPPAGE: A stoppage occurs when something interrupts the cycle of operation (hence stoppage). A stoppage can easily be fixed by theshooters and does not require an armorer or qualified individual to fix it.
(SLIDE #11)
c. INDICATORS: Once the rifle ceases firing, you must visually or physically observe the ejection port to identify the problem before they can clear it. The steps taken to clear the weapon are based on observation of one of the following indicators:

(1) Bolt is forward or ejection port cover is

closed.
(2) Bolt is locked to the rear.
(3) Brass is obstructing chamber area (Usually

indicates double feed or failure to eject).


(4) Brass stuck above the bolt.
(5) Audible pop (reduced recoil, or excessive smoke

escaping from the chamber. May indicate a bullet is lodged in the bore).


d. CORRECTIVE ACTION: Corrective action is the process of identifying the cause of the stoppage, clearing the stoppage, and returning the weapon to operation. Knowing the five indicators will help you to understand what type of stoppage your rifle has, but that alone is not enough. We must also know how to clear the stoppage and perform the appropriate steps to reload the weapon and continue engaging the enemy.


INSTRUCTOR’S NOTE:
DEMONSTRATE PROCEDURES FOR CLEARING THE WEAPON WHEN THE INDICATOR OBSERVED IS THE BOLT FORWARD OR THE EJECTION PORT COVER CLOSED.




(SLIDE #12)
(1) Failure to Fire and Bolt Forward: This type of stoppage can occur when a weapon fails to feed the round from the magazine or feeds it improperly. When the weapon fails to fire, the individual should first observe the ejection port cover. When the ejection port cover is observed, and the bolt is completely forward or the ejection port cover is closed,

Perform the “immediate action – TAP, RACK, BANG” to return the weapon to Condition 1:


(a) Observe: The ejection port cover.
(b) Tap: Tap the bottom of the magazine.
(c) Rack: Pull the charging handle to the rear and

release it.


(d) Bang: Sight in and attempt to fire.


INSTRUCTOR’S NOTE:
DEMONSTRATE PROCEDURES FOR CLEARING THE WEAPON WHEN THE INDICATOR OBSERVED IS THE BOLT IS LOCKED TO THE REAR.

(SLIDE #13)
(2) Bolt Locked To The Rear: Although a dry weapon is not considered a true stoppage or mechanical failure, you must take action to return the weapon to operation. The appropriate procedure to get the weapon to condition 1 from observing this indicator is:
(a) Observe: The ejection port cover.

(b) Conduct a speed reload.


(c) Sight in and attempt to fire


INSTRUCTOR’S NOTE:
DEMONSTRATE PROCEDURES FOR CLEARING THE WEAPON WHEN THE INDICATOR OBSERVED IS BRASS OBSTRUCTING THE CHAMBER.




(SLIDE #14)
(3) Obstruction in the Chamber: When the weapon fails to fire, you should first observe the ejection port cover. When the ejection port cover is observed, the bolt will be slightly separated from the chamber due to the round not seating properly. This can indicate a double feed or a failure to eject.
(a) Double feed is a stoppage that occurs when two rounds are stripped from the magazine by the bolt and are forced into the chamber at the same time.
(b) Failure to eject is a stoppage that occurs when the expelled brass casing does not sufficiently eject out of the chamber. This causes the feeding process of the cycle of operations to be interrupted.
(c) Perform “remedial action” to get the weapon back to Condition 1:
1. Observe: The ejection port cover.
2. Attempt to place weapon on safe.
3. Attempt to lock the bolt to the rear.
a. If the bolt will not lock to the rear,

rotate the rifle so the ejection port is facing down; hold the charging handle to the rear as far as it will go and shake

the rifle to free the round(s). If the rounds do not shake free, hold the charging handle to the rear and strike the butt of the rifle on the ground or manually clear the round.
4. Remove the magazine.
5. Clear out the obstruction.
6. Conduct a reload.
7. Sight in and attempt to fire.

(SLIDE #15)

INSTRUCTOR’S NOTE:
DEMONSTRATE PROCEDURES FOR CLEARING THE WEAPON WHEN THE INDICATOR OBSERVED IS BRASS STUCK OVER THE BOLT.

(4) Brass Over Bolt: This stoppage will prevent the bolt from moving and is caused by the weapon failing to feed or extract properly. To return the weapon to operation:
(a) Attempt to place the weapon on SAFE.
(b) Remove the magazine and place the butt stock on the deck.
(c) Pull the charging handle to the rear and hold it.
(d) Rotate the service rifle so that the ejection

port is facing you.


(e) Hold the bolt face back with a sturdy, slender object (e.g., stripper clip, knife, Multi-Tool) while simultaneously pushing forward on the charging handle to clear the obstruction.
(f) Check the chamber area to ensure it is clear.
(g) Conduct a speed reload.
(h) Sight in and attempt to fire, if applicable.
(SLIDE #16)
3. Audible Pop/Reduced Recoil. (13 MIN) An audible pop/reduced recoil occurs when only a portion of the propellant is ignited. It is normally identifiable by reduced recoil and is sometimes accompanied by excessive smoke escaping from the chamber area.

(a) Procedures For Clearing an Audible Pop/Reduced Recoil While on the Rifle Range: If an audible pop/reduced recoil occurs while on the rifle range, execute the following steps:

(1) STOP FIRING! Keep the weapon oriented down range and

in your shoulder.


(2) Observe and attempt to place the weapon in

condition 4.


(3) Raise your firing hand and ask for assistance from the coach or block NCO.

INSTRUCTOR’S NOTE:
DEMONSTRATE PROCEDURES TO CLEAR AN AUDIBLE POP/REDUCED RECOIL.

(b) Procedures For Clearing an Audible Pop/reduced recoil While in a Combat Environment: If an audible pop/ reduced recoil occurs while in a combat environment, execute the following the steps to clear the weapon:
(1) STOP FIRING! Observe and Place the weapon in Condition 4.
(2) Push the rear take down pin all the way (from left

to right as far as it will go to allow the lower receiver to pivot); pivot lower receiver.


(3) Remove the bolt carrier group.
(4) Inspect the bore for an obstruction

(5) Insert a cleaning rod into the bore from the muzzle

end and clear the obstruction.
(6) Reassemble the rifle.

(7) Conduct a reload.

(8) Sight in and attempt to fire.
(SLIDE #17)
TRANSITION: Now that we have just covered malfunctions and stoppages, are there any questions? I have one for you.
QUESTION: What is the appropriate action when experiencing a stoppage where the weapon fails to feed the round, or feeds it incorrectly?
ANSWER: Immediate Action – TAP, RACK, BANG: Observe, tap the bottom of the magazine, rack the charging handle to the rear, sight in and attempt to fire.
Notes:__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
INTERIM TRANSITION: Thus far we have covered, cycle of operations, stoppages and malfunctions and audible pop procedures. Are there any questions? Let’s move into the demonstration portion.


DEMONSTRATION: (15 MIN) The Combat Marksmanship Trainer will demonstrate the skills covered during the lecture. This demonstration requires (1) service rifle, common weapon sling and a magazine.
STUDENT ROLE: The students will be in a good position to view the demonstration, and will hold all questions until prompted at the end of the demonstration.
INSTRUCTOR ROLE: The Combat Marksmanship Trainer will ensure that all students can view the demonstration and that the four safety rules are followed at all times during the demonstration. Before commencing the demonstration, the Combat Marksmanship Trainer will Make a Condition 4 Weapon, Show Clear and let at least two other individuals inspect their weapon and all magazines. The CMT will then evaluate each shooter with a (PECL) to satisfy the necessary requirements for the Weapons Handling Test.

1. Safety Brief: Brief the Shooters per the ORAW associated with this lesson.


2. Supervision and Guidance: The Combat Marksmanship Trainer will demonstrate at half speed so all shooters can follow every step. The Combat Marksmanship Trainer will demonstrate and explain proper corrective action procedures as well as weapons conditions.
3. Debrief: The Combat Marksmanship Trainer will answer any questions, provide overall feedback, and review the learning points of the demonstration.



INTERIM TRANSITION. How that we have covered the demonstration are there any questions? Let’s move into our practical application portion of the lesson.


PRACTICAL APPLICATION: (60 MINS) Students will perform four safety rules, transports for the service rifle, and weapons handling. Students will perform the techniques with their weapon, common weapon sling, and 2 magazines. Following the Practical-application, the student officer’s will conduct their Weapons Handling Test, graded by a (PECL).
PRACTICE: The students will be in an L column outside at TBS either at Cannon Field or the barracks quad, and follow the instructions from his Platoon CMT. Every coach as well as CMT will observe the SHOOTERS for safety and proper technique.
PROVIDE HELP: The tower will have the portable loud speakers and will announce all commands for the SHOOTERS to follow. The CMT will observe their platoon ensuring safety and offering assistance as needed.
1. Safety Brief: Brief the SHOOTERS per the ORAW associated with this lesson.
2. Supervision and Guidance: The Combat Marksmanship Trainer will ensure that the four safety rules are followed at all times during the practical application.
3. Debrief: The Combat Marksmanship Trainer will answer any questions, provide overall feedback, and review the learning points of the practical application.



TRANSITION. Now that we have covered the practical application, are there any questions? I have one for you.
Question:
Answer:
Notes:__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Let’s summarize.

(SLIDE #18)
SUMMARY (5 MIN)
During this period of instruction we discussed, cycle of operations, malfunctions and stoppages as well as audible pop procedures.

In order to be efficient in combat, every Marine must be proficient with their weapon and do their part to engage the enemy and accomplish the mission. A stoppage and/or malfunction can take you and your rifle out of the fight. Marines depend upon each other in combat to fulfill their assigned duties and responsibilities. The faster a Marine can execute the procedures of clearing a stoppage or malfunction, the more dependable they will become to their fellow Marines while engaged by the enemy.



INSTRUCTOR’S NOTE:
HAVE THOSE SHOOTERS WITH INSTRUCTIONAL RATING FORMS (IRFS) FILL THEM OUT AND TURN THEM IN AT THIS TIME.




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