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Third Grade Michigan’s Economic Development Lesson 12 Title


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Third Grade Michigan’s Economic Development

Lesson 12

Title: Michigan’s Automobile Industry
Unit of Study: Third Grade Michigan’s Economic Development
GLCEs:

E1.0.3 Analyze how Michigan’s location and natural resources influenced its economic development (e.g., how waterways and other natural resources have influenced economic activities such as mining, lumbering, automobile manufacturing, and furniture making.)

4-H3.0.1 Use historical inquiry questions to investigate the development of Michigan’s major economic activities from statehood to present.

  • What happened?

  • When did it happen?

  • Who was involved?

  • How and why did it happen?

  • Who does it relate to other events or issues in the past, in the present, or in the future?

  • What is its significance?

4-H3.0.6 Use a variety of primary and secondary sources to construct a historical narrative about the beginnings of the automobile industry and the labor movement in Michigan.

4-H3.0.9 Create timelines to sequence and describe important events in Michigan history: annotate with connections to the past and impact on the future.
Abstract: Students will use narratives and biographies to investigate the beginnings of the automobile industry.
Key Concepts: horseless carriages, steam engine, gasoline-powered engine, Co. (company)

Sequence of Activities: (approximately three 30 minute lessons)
  1. Ask students to predict “Who are these eight men from our history? What did they do?”


    • Charles King

    • Ransom E. Olds

    • Henry Ford

    • William Durant

    • David Buick

    • Louis Chevrolet

    • Walter Chrysler

Students should recognize a few of the last names as “car” names. Students will learn about Michigan’s auto industry through these men’s stories. Discuss how Michigan’s location (by main roads, Great Lakes) influenced automobile manufactures to develop their factories in Detroit, Flint, and Lansing.

  1. Read Michigan History for Kids: Gentlemen, Start Your Engines! (Included) pages 4-5. Students will be introduced to Charles King as the first man in Detroit (maybe even Michigan) to drive a horseless gasoline-powered carriage. Picture of King and his assistant driving the horseless carriage. Hold the control key while you use the scroll wheel on your mouse to enlarge the picture.





  1. Students will each get one blank index card and write: (Post-It notes will also work for this activity. Students will use index card to answer some “historian” type questions:




    • What happened?

    • When did it happen?

    • Who was involved?

    • How and why did it happen?

    • Why was it important?

    • How do these things relate or go together?

Start with:


Charles B. King

March 6, 1896

Detroit, Michigan

Attached a gasoline engine to a horseless

carriage




  1. Continue reading Michigan History for Kids: Gentlemen, Start Your Engines! (Included) pages 6-7. Click on the pictures. Hold the control key while you use the scroll wheel on your mouse to enlarge the pictures. Show the Curved-Dash Runabout.

  2. Students will each get three blank index cards and write:


Ransom E. Olds

1897

Lansing, Michigan



Started the Olds Motor Vehicle Company

Ransom E. Olds

1900

Lansing, Michigan



Introduced the Curved Dash Runabout


Ransom E. Olds

1904

Lansing, Michigan



Vehicle Company

    • Started a new company with his

initials: REO Motor Car Company


  1. Continue reading Michigan History for Kids: Gentlemen, Start Your Engines! (Included) pages 8-9. There are great pictures, quotes from Henry Ford, and addition information at this web address. The Assembly Line. http://www.sos.state.mi.us/history/museum/explore/museums/hismus/1900-75/erlyauto/assembly.html




  1. Students will each get three blank index cards and write:


Henry Ford

1896

Detroit, Michigan



Tested his quadricycle


Henry Ford

1903

Detroit, Michigan



Started the Ford Motor Company

Henry Ford

1908 - 1927

Detroit, Michigan

More that 15 million Model-T cars were sold


  1. (Optional) Read The Mitten: Ford’s Model T




  1. Continue reading Michigan History for Kids: Gentlemen, Start Your Engines! (Included) pages 10-11. Small biographies with pictures.

  2. Students will each get four blank index cards and write:


William C. Durant

1904

Flint, Michigan



from Scottish immigrant David Buick

William C. Durant

1908

Flint, Michigan



  • Started the General Motors Co. (GM)

  • Bought Oldsmobile



William C. Durant

1909 - 1910

Flint, Michigan



Reliance Motor Truck Co. (GMC Truck)

  • Fired from GM Company 1910


William C. Durant

1911

Flint, Michigan



Chevrolet



  1. Read small section on Walter P Chrysler from the web site: http://www.sos.state.mi.us/history/museum/explore/museums/hismus/1900-75/erlyauto/onwheels.html Putting America on Wheels.




  1. Students will each get two blank index cards and write:


Walter P. Chrysler

1925

Flint, Michigan




Walter P. Chrysler

1928

Flint, Michigan



  • Also made Plymouth and DeSoto cars




  1. Have students brainstorm what changes have occurred from the auto industry. Continue reading Michigan History for Kids: How the Car Changed America pages 14-15 for many more ideas. Students will add some important changes in Michigan and possible changes for the future on the back of their index cards.

  2. Students will arrange their index cards or post-it notes in chronological order.

  3. Add the auto industry to your classroom timeline. (Olds 1887, Ford 1896, Buick 1904)



Connections:


English Language Arts:

Listening and discussion skills

Note taking
Mathematics

Number line


Instructional Resources:
Equipment/Manipulative

13 Index Cards or Post-It notes per student


Student Resources:




Teacher Resources:





Calhoun ISD Social Studies Curriculum Design Project


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