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Sample MMM manuscript for submission to AIP Advances
Jane A. Author,1,2,a) Yiu-Lam Author,2,b) John B. Author, Jr.,3,b,c) and XYZ Collaboration3

1Department, University, City, Postal code, Country

2Corporation or Laboratory, Street address, Postal code, City, Country

3Department, University, City, State (spell out full name) Zip code, USA
In this sample article, we provide instructions on how to prepare and submit an article presented at the Conference on Magnetism and Magnetic Materials to AIP Advances, an open-access journal published by AIP Publishing. Authors are encouraged to follow the instructions given in this document to prepare a manuscript. This an example of an abstract, which is required and should be self-contained (contain no footnotes). The abstract should be approximately 200 words, written as one paragraph, and should not contain displayed mathematical equations or tabular material. References that appear in the abstract must be fully cited here; numbered references begin in the body of the text.

I. THE MANUSCRIPT

Use this “sample manuscript” as a template for preparing an article. This will ensure that your submission will be in the required format for peer review. Please read all of the following manuscript preparation instructions carefully and in their entirety. The manuscript must be in good scientific American English; this is the author's responsibility. All files must be submitted through our online electronic submission system at http://mmm.peerx-press.org/.



  1. Manuscript preparation

Articles must be prepared as either a Microsoft Word .doc/docx file or a REVTeX/LaTeX file. The entire manuscript, should be set up for 21.6 × 28 cm (8-1/2 × 11 in. or A4) pages with 2.54 cm (1 in.) margins all the way around. The font and the point size will be reset according to the journal’s specifications, but authors most commonly use the Times Roman font and point size 12. The manuscript must begin with a title, the names of all authors and their affiliations, and an abstract, followed by the body of the paper, tables and figures, if any, included, and the reference section. Consecutively number all tables (I, II, III, etc.) and figures (1, 2, 3, etc.), including those in an Appendix. All figure source files must be uploaded separately upon submission. To aid the reviewer, authors should also embed the figures in text. Figure captions must
be included in the manuscript. Number all pages consecutively, beginning with 1.

B. Manuscript length guidelines

Article length is dictated by the article type, invited or contributed. If you were invited to present your work at the conference, your manuscript is considered an invited paper. Otherwise, your manuscript is considered a contributed paper. Please follow the guidelines below based upon this information. Please note that in order for your work to be published, papers must be presented at the Conference and by registered Conference attendees, either by the author or by his/her representative who is knowledgeable about the work and able to answer questions.



1. Manuscript length for invited articles

For users of Word™, invited manuscripts should not exceed approximately 6000 words (seven printed journal pages). Abstract, title, author list, references and acknowledgments are all excluded from the 6000-word limit. Figures, tables, and equations, however, are included and must be accounted for by calculating the following word count equivalent to the space they occupy:

Highlight the manuscript text, excluding abstract, author list, acknowledgements and references, and note the word count at the bottom of the screen. Add to that the word-count-equivalents for figures, tables, and equations as follows:

Figures: 400 words for an average figure.



  1. Tables: 13 words per line, plus 26 words.

  2. Equations: 13 words per line.

If the total number of words (text + figures + tables + equations) is 6000 or less, the length is acceptable.
For TeX users, authors are advised to use the REVTeX 4.1 file. If the version of the manuscript obtained using the “reprint” option fits on six pages, the length is acceptable.

2. Manuscript length for contributed articles

For users of Word™, contributed manuscripts should not exceed approximately 3500 words (four printed journal pages). Abstract, title, author list, references and acknowledgments are all excluded from the 3500-word limit. Figures, tables, and equations, however, are included and must be accounted for by calculating the following word count equivalent to the space they occupy:

Highlight the manuscript text, excluding abstract, author list, acknowledgements and references, and note the word count at the bottom of the screen. Add to that the word-count-equivalents for figures, tables and equations as follows:


  1. Figures: 400 words for an average figure.

  2. Tables: 13 words per line, plus 26 words.

  3. Equations: 13 words per line.

If the total number of words (text + figures + tables + equations) is 3500 or less, the length is acceptable.

For users of TeX, authors are advised to use the REVTeX 4.1 file. If the version of the manuscript obtained using the “reprint” option fits on four pages, the length is acceptable.



C. Manuscript submission

All files must be submitted through the online system: http://mmm.peerx-press.org/. Each version of the manuscript (the original and subsequent revisions) should be submitted with its own complete set of files: a cover letter (indicating the title, authors, and contact information), a complete article file, and separate figure files (see Sec. IX―FIGURES). When uploading a revised manuscript, also include a response/rebuttal letter (indicating the changes made to address the Editor’s and Reviewers’ comments). Please be mindful of all deadline dates for submission, review, and revisions as they are strictly enforced.



II. TITLE

Make the title as concise as possible but informative enough to facilitate information retrieval. Only the most common acronyms and abbreviations are allowed in the title. Use acronyms with considerable moderation and always define at first use.



III. ABSTRACT

Limit the abstract to approximately 200 words. It must be self-contained (contain no footnotes or citations to references), adequate as an index (giving all subjects, major and minor, about which new information is given), and a concise summary (giving the conclusions and all results of general interest in the article). The abstract must be one paragraph and should not contain displayed mathematical equations or tabular material. PACs numbers or keywords are not required.



IV. AUTHORS’ NAMES AND AFFILIATIONS

Authors’ names should preferably be written in a standard form for all publications to facilitate discoverability and to avoid ambiguities. Titles are not allowed before author names (e.g., Dr., Prof., etc.). Degrees are not allowed after author names (e.g., Ph.D., D.Sc., M.S., etc.). Include the names and postal addresses for all institutions, followed by city, state, postal code, and country. (Authors with US affiliations must include postal code, city, and USA.) See the byline of this sample article for examples.

Authors with Chinese, Japanese, or Korean names may choose to have their names published in their own language alongside the English versions of their names in the author list of their publications. For Chinese, authors may use either Simplified or Traditional characters. Chinese, Japanese, or Korean characters must be included within the author list of the manuscript when submitting or resubmitting. The manuscript must be prepared using Microsoft Word or using the CJK LaTeX package. Specific guidelines are given here.

V. FOOTNOTES

Footnotes are generally unacceptable in AIPP journals, with the exception of footnotes to the title and the author’s names. Footnotes to the title should be set as a Note above the byline footnotes. All other footnotes should be converted to text or should be included in the reference section. Use a), b), c), etc., for footnotes to authors. The following list shows some examples:

Note: Contributed paper, published as part of the Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Physics, Anytown, State, January 2011.



a)A. Author and B. Author contributed equally to this work.

b)This research was performed while C. Author was at Anywhere National Laboratory, City, State, Postal code, Country.

c)This is an example of a footnote to an author’s name: Author to whom correspondence should be addressed. Electronic mail: author@somewhere.org.

VI. HEADINGS

Headings are not mandatory. Maintain a consistent heading style within the article. Sections are numbered in the following order:

I. PRINCIPLE HEADING

A. First subheading

1. Second subheading

a. Third subheading.

VII. EQUATIONS

Equations need to be editable so we recommend that you create them with the built-in Microsoft® Equation Editor included with your version of Word. If you wish to use Mathtype, check for compatibility at http://tinyurl.com/lzny753.



  • Users of the Windows version of Word: Please embed all fonts.

  • Users of Macintosh Word: Please save all files in DOCX format, as the use of DOC is not supported. Additionally, because font embedding is not possible, Mac Word users should limit their font selection to those available from the basic installation.

Equations should be punctuated and aligned to bring out their structure and numbered consecutively throughout on the right. Mathematical operation signs indicating continuity of the expression should be placed at the left of the second and succeeding lines. Use (×) rather than a centered dot, except for scalar products of vectors. Use a solidus (/) instead of built-up fractions in running text, and in display wherever clarity would not be jeopardized. Use “exp” for complicated exponents.

, (1)
(2)
In appendices, the numbering sequence (A1), (A2), (A3), etc., is acceptable.


VIII. NOTATION

Notation must be legible, clear, compact, and consistent with standard usage. Choose commonly used symbols from your discipline. All unusual symbols whose identity may not be obvious must be identified the first time they appear, and at all subsequent times when confusion might arise.

IX. FIGURES

Cite figures in text in numerical order of publication-ready illustrations. It is vital that you prepare your illustrations so that they are legible when reduced. Figures 1–6 show examples of various types of production-ready illustrations: color, line art, halftone, and combination (line art and halftone). Table I gives (a) general guidelines for preparing your illustrations and (b) guidelines for the preparation of electronic files.



FIG. 1. This figure will appear in color in print and online. Figures should be created at 600 dpi and submitted at 600 dpi for the best presentation.



FIG. 2. This figure will appear in color online. Figures should be created at 600 dpi and submitted at 600 dpi for the best presentation. Choose RGB (red, green, blue) for any figure that will appear in color online.

FIG. 3. This is a good example of information that was presented clearly. The reader is s able to discern the “red” triangles, the closed “green” circles, and the open “black” circles


FIG. 4. This is an example of line art. Line art figures should be created at 600 dpi and submitted at 600 dpi for the best presentation. Save line art as black/white bitmap, not grayscale.



FIG. 5. This is an example of a halftone. Halftone figures should be created at 265 dpi and submitted at 265 dpi for the best presentation.


FIG. 6. This is an example of a combination figure (line art and halftone). Combination figures should be created at 600 dpi and submitted at 600 dpi for the best presentation.



TABLE I. This table provides instructions on how to prepare figures.

  1. General guidelines for preparing illustrations

         Number figures in the order in which they appear in the text.

         Label all figure parts with (a), (b), etc. Each figure file should contain all parts of the figure. For example, if Fig.1 contains three parts [(a), (b), and (c)], then all parts should be combined in a single file for Fig. 1.

         Avoid any large disparity in size of lettering and labels used within one illustration.

         Prepare illustrations in the final published size, not oversized. The maximum published width for a one-column illustration is 8.5 cm (3-3/8 in.).

         In cases where reduction is required, avoid small open symbols that tend to fill in and avoid small lettering; ensure that, in the final published illustration, there is a minimum of 8-point type size (2.8 mm high; 1/8 in. high) for lettering and 0.5-point width for lines.

         Ensure that lettering and lines are dark enough, and thick enough, to reproduce clearly. Remember that fine lines tend to disappear upon reduction.

  1. Guidelines for preparation of electronic graphics files




         Acceptable formats for figures: Portable Document Files (PDF), Encapsulated PostScript Files (EPS), PostScript, or Tagged Image File (TIF), and JPEG (.jpg) Microsoft Word files are not acceptable.

         More detailed information is given about figure preparation on the website in the Preparing Graphics instructions.

         Settings: Set the graphic for 600 dpi resolution for line art, 265 dpi for halftones, and 600 dpi for combinations (line art + halftone).

         Save line art as black/white bitmap, not grayscale.

         Save halftones and combinations as grayscale, not black/white bitmap.




         Submit color files at 600 dpi in one of the accepted file formats: PDF, EPS, PS, or TIF. No other type of color illustration is acceptable. When selecting a file mode, choose RGB (red, green, blue).

         PDF files should be vector files.

         In the PDF illustration, resolution of any shaded or photographic images must be 600 pixels per inch (PPI).

         Within the PDF illustration, resolution of line art with no shading should be 1200 pixels per inch (PPI).

         All fonts must be embedded in the PDF.

         Select "High Quality Print" when creating a PDF through the application’s print command.




         The author is responsible for obtaining permissions to reuse previously published material. Full credit lines are needed for figures that are used with permission. An example of the recommended format for crediting material from a journal article is: “Reprinted with permission from [FULL CITATION]. Copyright [PUBLICATION YEAR], AIP Publishing.” Full citation format is as follows: Author names, journal title, Vol. #, Issue #, Page # (or CID#), Year of publication. For example, the credit line would appear as: “Reprinted with permission from J. Chem. Phys. 128, 024365 (2012). Copyright 2012 AIP Publishing.




X. TABLES

Separate tables (numbered with Roman numerals in the order of their appearance in the text) should be used for all tabular material. Tables must be embedded in the article file, not uploaded like figure files. The structure should be clear. Use simple column headings and include units of measure. Table captions are positioned above the table and should be styled as “TABLE I. This is a table caption.” A caption should make its table intelligible without reference to the text. Capitalize the first word in the table headings and subheadings. References within tables are designated by lowercase Roman letter superscripts and given at the end of the table. Unaltered computer output and notation should be uploaded as supplementary files. See Table II for an example of correct table styling.


TABLE II. Bond distances for alkene molecules (atomic units).

No. Ca

RI,I+1b

SRI,I+1c

RI−1,I+RI,I+1

SRI−1,I+RI,I+1

2

2.5255







4

2.6175

0.123

5.306



6

2.6314

0.0999

5.3025

0.0112

8

2.6368

0.0876

5.3009

0,0111

10

2.6396

0.0795

5.2999

0.0106

aC is the number of carbon atoms.

bRI,I+1 is the distance between two neighboring carbon atoms, while ‹RI,I+1› is the average

of RI,I+1 for a given molecule.



cSRI,I+1 is the standard deviation of RI,I+1 within the given molecule.
XI. MULTIMEDIA SUBMISSIONS

Multimedia files can be included in the online version of published papers. All such files are peer reviewed. When published, these files can be viewed by clicking on a link from the figure caption, provided that the reader has a video player installed, such as Windows Media PlayerTM, Quick Time PlayerTM, or RealOne PlayerTM. Please click on Supporting Data in our Author Resource Center. Please note the following important information when preparing your manuscript:



  • Submit all multimedia files initially with the manuscript.

  • Treat all multimedia files as figures numbered in sequence as they are referred to in text.

  • For each multimedia file, provide a figure, which is a static representation of the multimedia file. Also provide an accompanying caption. At the end of the caption, include the phrase, "(multimedia view)."

Video and other enhanced files should be in a format that the majority of readers can view without too much difficulty. Please click on Supporting Data in our Author Resource Center for specific submission requirements.

XII. CONCLUSION

This section should include a brief summary of the problem, the goals of your research, how the results advanced the understanding of this research area, new questions or directions raised from your research, and the next steps for your research group, if applicable. Explain or justify ambiguous, vague, or uncertain results. Be sure that you do not include a lengthy or repetitive discussion in this section.



XIII. SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL

Text material that may not be of interest to all readers, long data tables, multimedia, and computer programs may be deposited as supplementary materials.

An article can have only one reference citing the supplementary material within the article. All citations of the supplementary material in the text must link to that reference. Information about depositing supplementary material may be found in Supporting Data in our Author Resource Center.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Typically, standard acknowledgments include financial support and technical assistance, and may include dedications, memorials, and awards. Check with the Editorial Office for suitability of an acknowledgment if there is any question. To indicate the author, use initials. For example, “J.A. wishes to thank A. Smith for technical assistance. Y.A. wishes to thank Anytown University for use of their equipment.” Note: the Acknowledgments section is not a numbered section.



APPENDIX

Appendices are placed after the acknowledgments section and before the listing of references. Appendices must have a Level One heading as illustrated below. They do not follow the sequential heading numbering given in the rest of the paper. If there is only one appendix, then the heading is set as follows:



APPENDIX

If there is more than one appendix, the headings are set as:
APPENDIX A: DESCRIPTION

APPENDIX B: DESCRIPTION
Subheadings in an Appendix are labeled 1, 2, etc.


REFERENCES

References may be styled as numerical, bibliographic, or numerical bibliographic. Duplicate references are not permitted.

Note that numerical references should be numbered consecutively in order of first appearance in the text and should be given in a separate double-spaced list at the end of the text material. A numerical reference may be cited within other references; however, it must also be cited at least once in the main body of the paper.

See Table III for acceptable reference formats.

TABLE III. This table provides instructions on how to prepare references.



The author’s use of a reference style should be consistent throughout the paper. References to books and journal articles, listed at the end of the paper, should appear in one of these formats:
(1) Numerical: By number, in the order of first appearance, giving the names of the authors, the journal name, volume, year, and first page number only, as in:
53V. Bargmann, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 38, 961 (1952).
This paper will be listed as the 53rd in the list of references and cited as 53.

(2) Bibliographic: In alphabetical order according to the first author's last name, giving, in addition to the name, volume, year, and first and last page, also the title of the paper cited, as in:


Bargmann, V., "On the number of bound states in a central field of force,"' Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 38, 961–966 (1952).
Within the body of the paper, this reference will be cited as "Bargmann (1952)." If there are several articles by the same author(s) and the same year, they should be distinguished by letters, as in (1952a).

(3) Numerical Bibliographic: Alphabetically listed references (with full titles and page ranges) may be numbered according to their alphabetical order and cited by their number.




























1Berger, A., "Instabilities and waves on a columnar vortex in a strongly stratified and rotating fluid,"' Phys. Fluids 25, 961–966 (2013).


  • Articles “submitted to” or “accepted for publication” (but not yet published) in a journal must include article title: When possible, these references should be updated in the galley proof.


Samples of Numerical References:

























Books: List authors and editors. Must include publisher, city and year of publication, and the page numbers (unless the entire book is being cited).

























2R. J. Hunter, Zeta Potential in Colloid Science (Academic, New York, 1981) p.120.

























AIAA Papers: AIAA Papers: The usual format is: {Author’s names}, {Paper Title}, AIAA Pap. {usual formats are 99-1111 or 2004-2222}, {year -- corresponds to numbers on left side of paper number}..

























3M.S. Narayan and A. Banaszuk, “Experimental study of a novel active separation control approach,” AIAA Paper No. 2003-0060, 2003.


Conference proceedings: Include the list of authors, the title of the proceedings, the city and year of the conference, the name of the publisher (cannot be a laboratory or institution), city and year of publication (or the words “to be published”), and the page numbers. Include the full list of editors, if they are given.

























4R. K. Ahrenkiel, in Gallium Arsenide and Related Compounds 1993: Proceedings of the 20th International Symposium on Gallium Arsenide and Related Compounds, Freiburg, Germany, 29 August–2 September 1993, edited by H. S. Rupprecht and G. Weimann (Institute of Physics, London, 1994), pp. 685–690.

























Government publications: Format as for a book citation. Each must include the author(s), title of the publication, name of the publisher, city and year of publication, and page numbers (unless the entire publication is being cited).

























5D. Nunes, The Brillouin Effect (U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC, 1992).

























Journal citations: Include authors (see author rule above), volume number, beginning page number, and publication year:

























6J. D. Kiely and J. E. Houston, Phys. Rev. B 57, 12588 (1998).

























Laboratory report: May only be used if first deposited with a national depository such as the National Technical Information Service. (Check with the NTIS librarian at 703-605-6000.) Materials or reports in electronic form—codes, data tables,etc.—may be uploaded as supplementary material files (see Sec. XIII). If the paper is on deposit with NTIS, use the following format:

























7See National Technical Information Service Document No. DE132450 L. (R. Newchuck, SESAME Tables, LANL Rep. 23453, 1983). Copies may be ordered from the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161.
MOLPRO:

8H.-J. Werner, P. J. Knowles, R. Lindh, F. R. Manby, M. Schütz, et al., Molpro, version 2006.1, a package of ab initio programs, 2006, see http://www.molpro.net

























Multiple citations are acceptable:

























8D.-Y. Choi, S. Madden, A. Rode, R. Wang, and B. Luther-Davies, J. Non-Cryst. Solids 354, 3179 (2008); J. Appl. Phys. 104, 113305 (2008).

(same authors, different journals)

























or














































9J.Scaroni and T. Mckee, Solid State Technol. 40, 245 (1997); M. G. Lawrence, Bull. Am. Meteorol. Soc. 86, 225 (2005).

(two completely different references)





































or














































10Y. de Carlan, A. Alamo, M. H. Mathon, G. Geoffroy, and A. Castaing, J. Nucl. Mater. 283–287, 762 (2000); M. H. Mathon, Y. de Carlan, G. Geoffroy, X. Averty, A. Alamo, and C. H. de Novion, ibid. 312, 236 (2003).

(different authors, same journal)































Patents: Titles are allowed.
47K. Inoue, U.S. patent 3,508,029 (22 March 1970).

48 W. L. Tolin and A. M. Laud, U.S. patent pending (5 October 1996).

49 J. R. Smith, U.S. patent application 037/123,456 (18 May 2010).
Preprints and electronic postings: Preprints or eprints that have not been submitted to a journal for publication (i.e., are only posted on a preprint server) cannot be used as references.

























Private communication: May not be one of the authors of the article. Must include the year in which the communication took place.

























11A. Einstein (private communication, 1954).




















































Software manuals: If published, use the book format; if not published, give the entire address for the software maker.

























Thesis/dissertation: Include the author, school, and year, but not the title.

























12S. L. Goldschmidt, Ph.D. thesis, University of California, Los Angeles, 1985.

























Web sites: Due to their perishable nature, web sites are not generally acceptable as references unless the site is maintained as an archival site. It is permissible to include web sites as adjuncts to acceptable references.




aNote: Contributed paper, published as part of the Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Physics, Anytown, State, January 2011.

Jane A. Author and Yiu-Lam Author contributed equally to this work.

bThis research was performed while John B. Author was at Anywhere National Laboratory, City, State, Postal code, Country.

cThis is an example of a footnote to an author’s name: Author to whom correspondence should be addressed. Electronic mail: author@somewhere.org.



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