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Home Economics Education in New Zealand: a position Statement


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Conclusion


The home economics body of knowledge continues to be relevant and meaningful for students today and in the future. Within international and national contexts there is resurgence in home economics, as it is increasingly recognised as relevant to meeting current and future societal needs. Current research identifies significant changes in the learning and teaching focus of home economics, reflective of current and emerging paradigms and learning theories. These changes have been instrumental in enabling New Zealand students to achieve in home economics. These changes recognise home economics as a field of study that provides relevant and meaningful contexts for students’ learning. This research also recognises the contribution of the home economics discipline to the New Zealand Curriculum, in particular in the health and physical education learning area of the draft curriculum.
Despite the barriers of perceptions, gender, teacher supply and lack of recognised qualification pathways in the senior secondary school, home economics continues to provide meaningful courses of study for students, which they enjoy. This is a powerful enabler for student success in learning. Home economics is continually responding and transforming in response to society’s changing needs, but never losing the focus on the well-being of individuals and families within the home, community and society.

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From TKI | NZ Curriculum Marautanga Project | Health and physical education ­| Home Economics Education in New Zealand: A Position Statement Page of

Accessed from: http://www.tki.org.nz/r/nzcurriculum/draft-curriculum/health_physical_e.php


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