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Elkhart Public Schools

Elkhart, IN
Data Team Implementation

Configuration Map


317 Inverness Way South

Suite 150

Englewood, Colorado 80112

(800) 844-6599



www.MakingStandardsWork.com

Introduction
Elkhart Community Schools has committed to district-wide implementation of the Data Team™ concept. Data Teams™ is a proven set of processes that, when implemented, help educators to apply data-driven decision making at the classroom practitioner level (Besser, Davis & Perry, 2006). Reeves (2002) has suggested that data teaming helps perpetuate a “data-friendly” environment and takes the struggle out of working with data by clearly and specifically identifying areas of student need; at the same time, it reduces the isolation of teachers by encouraging effective collaboration.
What is a Configuration Map?
A Configuration Map is a means of describing what an innovation (e.g., Data Teams) “looks like” when fully implemented (Hall & Hord, 2006). The following configuration map paints a series of “word pictures” of the adult behaviors and practices in Elkhart Public Schools and also describes the behaviors and practices as Data Teams™ move from the “Not Proficient” variation toward the “Exemplary” variation, the behaviors and practices described increasingly approach the more ideal practices viewed by the school district.
A configuration map is divided into the operational characteristics or key “components” of the innovation which distinguish it from other approaches. For each “component” in this Data Team™ map there are four variations (stages) in the implementation process ranging from “Exemplary” (the desired state) to “Not Proficient” (implementation has not yet begun).
What is the Purpose of a Configuration Map?
A configuration map helps everyone (e.g., teachers, principals, central office staff, etc.) involved in implementing the innovation develop a common understanding of where they are headed. Having the “end in mind” helps us focus our efforts and avoid the problem of everyone doing things differently under the name of the innovation. Additionally, a configuration map helps individuals and organizations figure out where they are and what they need to do to move toward full implementation. For example, individual teachers, Data Teams™, and school/district leadership can use the map to determine progress in implementing this innovation and decide where to target specific training that will be most effective in moving teams toward the desired state.
How will we use the Configuration Map?
Elkhart Faculty should use this document to determine what variation within each Data Team™ component predominates. Data Teams™ reflections should be as candid as possible when determining their level of performance; this is not a rating tool, but a tool of self-reflection that will help teams determine where they are in the implementation process. Furthermore, every Data Team™ will be at different stages in different components. We expect that many teams will be in the early stages of implementation since we have just begun to explore the concept and framework of Data Teams™.

When deciding what variation (e.g., Proficient, Partially Proficient, etc.) your Data Team™ is at in a given component, please note that ALL descriptors must be satisfied to be at a particular variation. That is, if your Data Team™ does not fully match the description given within a variation, please mark the next lower variation. Remember, we have three to five years to figure this out, so take time to learn the knowledge and skills needed to implement Data Teams™ to a high level.

As a measurement tool, principals may elect to have Data Teams™ self-assess in all five components or specific components monthly. By summarizing the data they collect (e.g., the specific variations, which predominate in their school’s Data Teams™), principals can model for their staff how to use data to inform behaviors and practice. That is, the data they collect can be used to create precise plans and access sufficient resources to implement the desired expectations. For example, a school-wide professional development committee could use the IC maps to determine how well its current system aligns with the school district’s expectations. The IC maps can also be used as a rubric in connection with interviews, focus groups, or direct observation of the staff. Moreover, the monthly data will allow principals the opportunity to set goals and plan for continuing assistance and coaching for colleagues as they implement the Data Team™ expectations. When the IC maps are used to assess the current level of implementation, users will identify areas of strength and obstacles. Because the IC maps describe ideal practice, users can clarify the next steps to take in the process by examining the levels between current and ideal. They can plan appropriate interventions to help reach higher levels of implementation.

References

Besser, L., Anderson-Davis, D., & Peery, A. (2006). Data teams. Englewood,

CO: Advanced Learning Press.
Hall, G. E., and Hord, S. M. (2006). Implementing change: Patterns, principles,

and potholes (2nd ed.). Boston: Allyn and Bacon.
Reeves, D. B. (2002). The daily disciplines of leadership: How to improve student

achievement, staff motivation, and personal organization. San Francisco:

Jossey-Bass.

















A. Curriculum Mapping and Examining Expectations

Component Description: Developing a yearlong curriculum map and determining what essential concepts and skills students must master as a result of your teaching.




Exemplary

Proficient

Progressing

Not Proficient

(4)

(3)

(2)

(1)

All criteria for the proficient category have been successfully met. In addition:
-Teachers function as a team. They work collaboratively to identify collective curriculum goals, develop strategies to achieve those goals, gather relevant data, and learn from one another.

-Support and cooperation characterize relationships with colleagues. Teachers take initiative in assuming leadership within the Data Team process.



-Teacher’s collectively examine expectations (state standards or frameworks, district Power Standards, “unwrapped” standards, to develop a yearlong curriculum map (i.e., intended to depict what and when essential content and skills are to be taught).

-Teachers construct a common pacing guide to be used in the teaching of the content during the year to give students ample time to learn and apply skills.

-Teachers align their area of instructional focus so as to support the school and district improvement targets.


-Teachers recognize a common curriculum that they are responsible for teaching, but there is little agreement regarding the essential content and skills to be learned and applied by students.

-Teachers use a variety of criteria in determining how content should be sequenced, which varies from teacher to teacher.

-Teachers’ instructional areas of focus based more on favorite lessons, which may or may not align with the school’s improvement targets.


-Teachers plan for and deliver instruction in isolation. There is little awareness of what or what colleagues are teaching.

-Teachers’ instructional areas of focus vary from teacher to teacher.

-Teachers’ are unaware of what the school or district improvement targets are.




B. Create and Administer Common Post-Assessment

Component Description: Together, teachers agree on and create a common post-assessment and administer the assessment both BEFORE/AFTER teaching.




Exemplary

Proficient

Progressing

Not Proficient

(4)

(3)

(2)

(1)

All criteria for the proficient category have been successfully met. In addition:
-Everyone on the Data Team participates in an ongoing cycle of systematic gathering of data to shape and inform instructional and curricular practices.

-Teachers collaboratively score the assessments, analyze the results, and discuss ways to achieve improvements in student learning.




-Teachers meet periodically to create common post-assessments, which are aligned with large-scale assessments in terms of what students need to know and do.

-Teachers administer the common post-assessment before teaching, which becomes the pre-assessment.

-Teachers gather student achievement data that enables them to identify and monitor individual and group goals.

-Teachers administer the common post-assessment at the conclusion of the teaching time (i.e., unit, quarter, month, etc.) based on what students must know and be able to do (standards, framework).



- Teachers rarely meet to create common post-assessments, which are aligned with large-scale assessments in terms of what students need to know and do.

-Teachers assess to determine which students have learned the content and to what degree in order to assign a grade.




-Teachers never meet to create common post-assessments, which are aligned with large-scale assessments in terms of what students need to know and do.

-Teachers work in isolation from one another. That is, instructional planning, teaching, and assessment are highly individualistic.

-Teachers assess students at the end of a unit, chapter, quarter, etc to determine a grade.





C. Five-Step Data Team Process

Component Description: Teachers collectively examine how well students are doing, relate this to how they are teaching, and then make mid-course corrections to help all students achieve high standards.




Exemplary

Proficient

Progressing

Not Proficient

(4)

(3)

(2)

(1)

All criteria for the proficient category have been successfully met. In addition:
-Teachers explore and experiment with alternative combinations of Data Team practices (i.e., meet twice a month to examine together how well students are doing, relate this to how they are teaching, and then make improvements) to maximize student outcomes.

-The Data Team process is considered an essential school practice, which enables teachers to share ideas and best practices to develop and continuously improve instruction.





-Teachers apply the Data Team process smoothly with minimal management problems.

-Teachers come together at least monthly to examine data from teacher-created assessments.

-Teachers analyze strengths and obstacles to provide direction and focus. –Teachers establish goals directly related to annual school goals.

-Teachers select common instructional strategies to improve current levels of achievement.

-Teachers determine desired results indicators.


-Teachers manage the Data Team process with varying degrees of efficiency. The flow of actions is often disjointed, uneven and uncertain.

-Staff members participate in the Data Team process. Findings generated by this process are beginning to influence classroom practices.




-Teachers take no discernible action toward learning about or using the Data Team concept.

-Some staff members participate in pilot action projects. The sharing of findings is largely informal.

-Teachers demonstrate little attachment to anything or anybody. Teachers seem more concerned with their own identity than a sense of shared community.

-Teachers either never or rarely take time to share ideas and best lessons with their colleagues to develop and improve instruction.







D. Teach, Assess, Teach, and Access

Component Description: Teach, assess (formative—marker—use part or all of the pre/post assessment checking to see position of students in relation to proficiency of expected outcomes), teach (some more), and administer post assessment.




Exemplary

Proficient

Progressing

Not Proficient

(4)

(3)

(2)

(1)

All criteria for the proficient category have been successfully met. In addition:
-Teachers make certain that students take an active, rather than passive, role in the assessment of their own work.

-Teachers seek out opportunities for professional development and apply this new learning in her classroom.





-Teachers administer the common post-assessment before teaching, which becomes the pre-assessment.

-Teachers use pre-assessment results to plan for the instructional needs of individuals and groups of students.

-Teachers assess student understanding of the particular standards that the grade-level or department educators are focusing on in their individual instructional programs.

-Teachers occasionally interrupt instruction to use part or all of the pre/post assessment to check student learning so that mid-course corrections can be made.




-Teachers occasionally administer the common post-assessment before teaching.

-Teachers use assessment results to plan for the instructional needs of the class as a whole.

-Teachers implement the instructional strategy selected but with varying degrees of fidelity.

-Teachers use the results from the common post-assessment to determine which students have learned the content and to what degree in order to assign a grade.




-Teachers rarely administer the common post-assessment before teaching.

-Assessment results only minimally affect planning for the instructional needs of students.

-Teachers cannot agree upon a common instructional strategy they will all implement in order to help identify best practices.





E. Assess Efforts and Reflect On Teaching to Determine Next Steps

Component Description: The capacity to examine student performance data and results to understand the consequences of adult actions on student achievement in order to determine next steps.




Exemplary

Proficient

Progressing

Not Proficient

(4)

(3)

(2)

(1)

All criteria for the proficient category have been successfully met. In addition:
-Teachers make certain that students are aware of how they are meeting the established standards and how they can improve.

-Each Data Team member participates in an ongoing cycle of systematic gathering of data to shape and inform instructional and leadership decisions.

-The Data Team creates a data wall that reflects both effect (student) data as well as cause (adult) data.


-Teachers routinely administer the common post-assessment.

-Teachers submit post-assessment data to team leader for graphing prior to meeting.

-Teachers examine post-assessment data and collaboratively discuss what the data represent.

-Teachers use student work collected, analyze strengths and obstacles, determine degree of improvement, and intervention needs.

-Teachers use cause and effect data to determine next steps.

-Begin process again with the next critical expectation based on the pacing guide.



-Teachers occasionally administer a common post-assessment.

-Teachers tend to bring post-assessment data to the meeting with them.

-Teachers are sometimes reluctant examine post-assessment data and collaboratively discuss what the data represent out of fear of being compared to one another.

-Teachers occasionally use student work collected, analyze strengths and obstacles, determine degree of improvement, and intervention needs.

-Teachers use cause and effect data with varying degrees of fidelity.


-Teachers cannot agree on a common post-assessment to administer.

-Teachers have no common ground on which to compare assessment data.

-Teachers make no effort to share student achievement results with others.

-Teachers engage in no professional development activities to enhance knowledge or skill.

-Teachers tend to identify variables that they don’t control as impediments to learning (i.e., SES, language, etc.). Therefore identifying next steps is problematic.





© 2005 by Center for Performance Assessment Data Teams IC Configuration Map Template

All rights reserved. Copy only with permission. (800) 844-6599 Page




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