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Site Information Sheet

for nomination to join the East Asian-Australasian Shorebird Site Network

Discovery Bay Coastal Park




Part 1




  1. Date:


8 October 2004.

2. Country:


Australia.

3. Name of site:


Discovery Bay Shorebird Site, East Asian-Australasian Shorebird Site Network, Victoria.

4. Geographical coordinates:


Centred at latitude 38º 13’S, 141º 17’E. Includes the coastline between: 38º 03’S, 140º 58’E, and 38º 23’S, 141º 35’E.

5. Altitude:


From less than 10 metres above sea level to the low water mark.

6. Area:


10,460 hectares.

7. Overview:


Discovery Bay Coastal Park is internationally important for one species of migratory shorebird (Sanderling, Calidris alba). It is also important for one species of endemic shorebird (Hooded Plover, Thinornis rubricollis). The site includes the nationally important wetlands of Glenelg Estuary and Long Swamp (Environment Australia, 2001). The shorebird site includes a range of coastal environments including rugged cliffs, extensive beaches, extensive mobile dune fields, wetlands and woodland forest communities (Parks Victoria 2004). The management plan (Parks Victoria 2004) recognises numerous flora and fauna species of conservation value, indigenous cultural values, archaeological sites, education and recreational uses, and impacts such as invasive species and human-use.
The shorebird site includes the whole of Discovery Bay Coastal Park and that part of the Discovery Bay Marine National Park that is between high and low water mark.

8: Justification of Shorebird Site Network criteria:


Discovery Bay is an internationally important non-breeding area for Sanderling (Calidris alba) (Watkins 1993, Wetlands International, unpublished). It is the fourth most important site in Australia for Sanderling and has regularly supported more than 1% of the flyway population.


Species common name

Species scientific name

Minimum population estimate for flyway*

1% of minimum population in flyway*

Discovery Bay count

Date

Reference

Sanderling

Calidris alba

22,000

220

232

21/02/1981

AWSG digital database













560

01/01/1983

AWSG database













610

06/10/2005

AWSG database

* Flyway population estimates from Wetlands International (2002).


9. Wetland type:


Marine and Coastal Wetlands – E, F, G

E - Sand, shingle or pebble shores; includes sand bars, spits and sandy islets; includes dune systems.

F - Estuarine waters; permanent water of estuaries and estuarine systems of deltas.

G - Intertidal mud, sand or salt flats.



10. Outline map of site:


The following description should be read in conjunction with the site map on Page 3.
The shorebird site includes the whole of Discovery Bay Coastal Park plus that part of the Discovery Bay Marine National Park that is between high and low tide levels. Discovery Bay Coastal Park is proclaimed under the National Parks Act 1975 and described in Version No. 092 of the Act (incorporating amendments as at 27 May 2004), Schedule three, Part 3.
Discovery Bay Marine National Park is proclaimed under the National Parks Act 1975 and described in Version No. 092 of the Act (incorporating amendments as at 27 May 2004), Schedule seven, Part 5. Only the area between high and low water mark is included in the shorebird site.

11. Jurisdiction:


Land management: Parks Victoria

State: Victorian State Government

Conservation agency: Department of Sustainability and Environment.
12. Management Authority:

Parks Victoria

8-12 Julia Street

PORTLAND VIC 3305



13. Name and address of the compiler:


Peter Collins
RMB 4009
Cowes, 3922
Australia.
Ph: (03) 5952 1857

Fax: (03) 5952 1857



Email: moonbird@waterfront.net.au

14. General location:


Between the South Australian border and Nelson Bay, 320 kilometres south-west of Melbourne, Victoria. The population of Melbourne was 3.6 million in 2003.


15. Physical features:


The coastal landforms of Discovery Bay Shorebird Site include beaches, coastal cliffs, headlands and dune fields. The coastline is a dynamic high-energy system. The Glenelg River Estuary and Long Swamp in the site are recognised as nationally important wetlands (Environment Australia, 2001). Long Swamp is a shallow freshwater wetland fed by a ground water aquifer in the Discovery Bay dune barrier system. The Glenelg Estuary is a large estuarine system consisting of the main channel of the Glenelg River and a side lagoon called Oxbow Lake (Australian Wetlands Database).

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