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2 Corinthians 7: 10


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2 Corinthians 7:10


 - is the explanatory use of the postpositive conjunction GAR, meaning “For” and explaining why the Corinthians were offended, irritated, insulted, grieved as God would have it. Then we have the nominative subject from the feminine singular article and noun LUPĒ, which means “grief, sorrow, pain, irritation.” With this we have the preposition KATA plus the accusative of reference or relationship from the masculine singular noun THEOS, meaning “as God would have it.” This is followed by the accusative direct object from the feminine singular noun METANOIA, which means “a change of mind.” Then we have the preposition EIS plus the accusative of result from the feminine singular noun SWTĒRIA, which means “resulting in salvation, deliverance.” Here it means deliverance, since we are already dealing with believers as the recipients of the action. Then we have the accusative direct object from the feminine singular adjective AMETAMELĒTOS, which means “not to be regretted, without regret.”1 This adjective modifies the noun METANOIA. This is followed by the third person singular present deponent middle/passive indicative from the verb ERGAZOMAI, which means “to do, accomplish, carry out, bring about, practice, perform, or work.”

The present tense is an aoristic present for a present fact without reference to its progress.

The deponent middle/passive is middle/passive in form but active in meaning with the grief as God would have it producing the action.

The indicative mood is declarative for a simple statement of fact.


For the as-God-would-have-it grief accomplishes the without-regret change of mind resulting in deliverance.”
 - is the adversative use of the conjunction DE, meaning “But” plus the nominative subject from the feminine singular article and noun LUPĒ, again meaning “grief, sorrow, pain, irritation.” With this we have the subjective genitive from the masculine singular article and noun KOSMOS, meaning “of the world.” This is a reference to Satan’s cosmic system. In the subjective genitive the noun in the genitive (KOSMOS) produces the action implied in the noun of action (LUPĒ). Then we have the accusative direct object from the masculine singular noun THANATOS, meaning “death.” Finally, we have the third person singular present middle/passive deponent indicative from the verb KATERGAZOMAI, which means “to bring about, produce, or create.”2

The present tense is an aoristic present, which states a fact without reference to its beginning, its end, or its progress.

The deponent middle/passive is middle/passive in form but active in meaning.

The indicative mood is declarative for a simple statement of fact.


But the grief of the world [Satan’s cosmic system] produces death.”
2 Cor 7:10 corrected translation

For the as-God-would-have-it grief accomplishes the without-regret change of mind resulting in deliverance. But the grief of the world [Satan’s cosmic system] produces death.”


Explanation:
1. “For the as-God-would-have-it grief accomplishes the without-regret change of mind resulting in deliverance.”

a. I have not translated this sentence as most translators would because I wanted to maintain the adjectives with their nouns, in order to bring out the original thought of Paul more clearly.

b. Paul explains why the Corinthians were not really offended, insulted, grieved by Paul, but by their own bad decisions as God would have it.

c. God’s design is that believers punish themselves with their own bad decisions. This is the law of volitional responsibility, and is “as God would have it.”

d. Paul calls this kind of pain, grief, irritation, insult, and offense the kind that is produced or accomplished according to divine design or “as God would have it.”

e. Self-punishment is the result of the law of volitional responsibility. We sow to the wind and reap the whirlwind. We create our own self-inflicted misery. We create our own self-induced misery. We create our own self-punishment.

f. Self-punishment from our own bad decisions is the punishment, as God would have it.

g. Self-punishment leaves us with no one else to blame but ourselves.

h. Self-induced misery or grief as God would have it accomplishes or produces a change of mind or change of attitude in the carnal believer.

(1) When believers get out of fellowship with God, they begin to create their own self-induced misery.

(2) We punish ourselves, and then God adds divine discipline to it.

(3) The result of this much grief, pain, and irritation is that we have a change of mind about wanting to commit that sin again.

(4) This change of mind is described by Paul as being without regret. There is no emotion connected with it.

(5) There is no emotion connected with rebound. Rebound is a change of mind about sin and the spiritual life. We change our mind about wanting to sin and want to live the spiritual life God has designed for us rather than inside the cosmic system.

(6) We often make changes in our mind based on our emotions, but these are not the changes described by Paul here. This change is a change of mind that is not influenced by emotion, but by the objective knowledge of God’s love for us and our reciprocal love in return.

i. The best decisions in life are always made without emotion involved. Emotions only cloud the thinking and distort the truth, so that we end up making decisions based on incomplete or distorted information because of our emotions.

j. Self-induced misery and divine discipline produce an objective type of thinking and decision making, which is not influenced by emotion. These are sometimes the best decisions in life.

k. The result of the objective, non-emotional decisions to rebound and get back inside the spiritual life is deliverance from the cosmic system or carnal death.

(1) When the believer sins, he or she steps outside the spiritual life and into the cosmic system or Satan’s system of subjective thinking.

(2) In the cosmic system, all thinking is influenced by emotion. We make bad decisions clouded by emotion, resulting in subjectivity, arrogance, and mental and emotional sins.

(3) The only means of deliverance from this thinking is the objective, as God would have it thinking, which changes its mind about sin and the cosmic system and uses the recovery procedure of 1 Jn 1:9.

(4) Acknowledging our sins to God is objective, non-emotional, and is exactly as God would have it.

(5) The result is deliverance from the subjective, emotional, and sinful thinking of the cosmic system.

l. Therefore, the as God would have it self-induced misery motivates the recovery procedure from the cosmic system, which is exactly as God would have it.


2. “But the grief of the world [Satan’s cosmic system] produces death.”

a. In contrast to God’s design of self-induced misery and divine discipline to bring the believer out of the cosmic system, the pain, grief, and sorrow produced by life in the cosmic system produces carnal death.

b. There are many different kinds of death mentioned in the Bible, such as physical death, sexual death, the second death, etc.

c. But the death mentioned here is a reference to carnal death.


3. The Carnal Death of the Believer: Cosmic Death or Carnality.

a. The carnal death of the believer deals with three categories of failure:

(1) Post-salvation sinning.

(2) Post-salvation human good.

(3) Post-salvation evil.

b. The carnal death of the believer is the subject of the phrase in Eph 5:14, “Therefore, it says, ‘Wake up, you sleeper. Stand up out from the acts of sin.’”

c. The carnal death of the believer may also be classified in three ways:

(1) The temporal death of the believer, which describes the believer out of fellowship with God. This might be described as the status of committing an occasional sin with some elapse of time in between sins.

(2) The cosmic death of the believer. This is the believer involved in either cosmic one or cosmic two or both.

(3) The fragmented death of the believer, which is the believer involved in either moral or immoral degeneracy.

d. 1 Cor 3:1 describes carnality. “And I, brethren, could not speak to you as to spiritual persons, but as to carnal persons, even as to babies in Christ.”

e. Carnal, temporal, cosmic, or fragmented death refers to the function of the believer's volition in converting temptation from the sin nature into sinfulness.

(1) Whether the believer knows he is being tempted or not is never the issue. The issue is that you wanted to do that sin and you did it; therefore, ignorance is no excuse.

(2) The believer cannot sin inside the spiritual life. Therefore, the decision to sin is made outside the spiritual life.

(3) The decision to sin automatically places the believer inside the cosmic system. Living inside the cosmic system classifies that believer as living in temporal or cosmic death.

(4) For the believer, cosmic involvement through sin is always cosmic death. When in the cosmic system, you are in cosmic death.

(5) James 1:15, “When lust has become pregnant, it gives birth to sin. Furthermore, when sin is accomplished, it brings forth death.” Lust is temptation trying to penetrate the soul.

f. Volition is the guardian of your soul.

(1) Temptation is not a sin, but the act of volition which follows is the sin. When you say “yes” to the temptation, the old sin nature controls your soul.

(2) The sin nature dwells in the cell structure of the body and the Holy Spirit indwells the body. The question is: Who is going to control the soul?

(3) The believer’s decision to sin automatically gives control of the soul to the sin nature. And the believer in fellowship with God who decides not to sin continues gives control of the soul to the Holy Spirit.

g. Scripture.

(1) Jam 1:15, “Then when lust has become pregnant it gives birth to sin. Furthermore, when the sin is born [completed], it brings forth death.”

(2) 1 Tim 5:6, “But that widow who constantly indulges in wanton pleasure has died while she is living.”

(3) Rev 3:1b, “I know your production, that you have a reputation that you are living, but you are dead.”

(4) Rom 8:6, “For the mindset of the flesh [old sin nature] is death [cosmic death], but the mindset of the Spirit is life and prosperity.”

(5) Rom 8:13, “For if you are living according to the flesh [old sin nature], you must die [cosmic death], but if you through the Holy Spirit are putting to death the production of the flesh, you live.” When you say “no” to temptation you are in the spiritual life.

(6) 1 Jn 3:14a, “We know that we have changed our residence from the realm of death [cosmic system] to [the Christian way of] life.”

h. The believer who is positive to Bible doctrine understands how to recover from carnal death and keep moving, and does so. The negative believer continues under the control of the sin nature and is in the status of death while he lives. The negative believer eventually becomes a loser of his escrow blessings.

i. The believer who spends his life in carnal death usually dies physically from maximum divine discipline, the sin unto death. 1 Jn 5:16; Ps 118:17-18; Acts 5:1-10; Rev 3:16.




1 Bauer, Walter, Gingrich, F. Wilbur, and Danker, Frederick W., A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature, (Chicago: University of Chicago Press) 1979.

2 Bauer, Walter, Gingrich, F. Wilbur, and Danker, Frederick W., A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature, (Chicago: University of Chicago Press) 1979.





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